Photo from the climb.

Murrisk Travel Blog

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This is really a photo blog but I'll also give you a little info on Croagh Patrick.

Rising to 2510 feet (765 meters) near the town of Westport in County Mayo, the quartzite peak of Croach Patrick was a pagan sacred place long before the arrival of Christianity. For the Celtic peoples of Ireland it was the dwelling place of the deity Crom Dubh and the principal site of the harvest festival of Lughnasa, traditionally held around August 1 (until the mid-nineteenth century only women were allowed on the summit during this pilgrimage and childless women would sleep on the summit during Lughnasa eve in the hope of encouraging fertility). According to popular Christian stories, St. Patrick visited the sacred mountain during the festival time in AD 441 and spent forty days and forty nights banishing dragons, snakes, and demonic forces from the site.

Some of Clew Bay's 365 islands
Were there dragons and demonic forces actually living atop this mountain, or does the legend have a metaphorical rather than a literal meaning?

It was common for early Christians to view pagan religious practices as devil worship; thus the legend of Patrick slaying dragons and demonic forces on the sacred mountain is actually a metaphor for his subjugation and conversion of the pagan priests. In support of the pre-Christian sanctity of the mountain it is important to note that Neolithic foundations have been found on the summit and, on a natural rock outcrop (known as ‘St. Patrick’s Chair) along the pilgrimage route to the summit, Neolithic art has been discovered. By the seventh century the holy mountain had become one of the two most important Christian pilgrimage sites in all Ireland (the other being Station Island, also called St.

Patrick's Purgatory, in Lough Derg). Prior to AD 1113 the pilgrims came to the mountain during Lent, but following a wild storm in which thirty pilgrims died upon the peak, the pilgrimage period was changed to summer, with the most popular days being the last Friday and Sunday of July.

Currently it is estimated that nearly one million pilgrims climb to the summit each year, as many as thirty thousand on the last Sunday in July. In the Irish Christian tradition the ascent is undertaken as an act of penance for wrongdoing, and many of the pilgrims climb barefooted or even on their knees. The ancient worship at Mt. Croach Patrick, however, had nothing to do with matters of penance and supposed wrongdoing. The holy mountain was a sanctuary for the giving of thanks and the celebration of life's abundance.

Similar to what occurred at many other prehistoric sacred places across Europe, at Croagh Patrick Christianity has warped, stifled and corrupted the natural human tendency to venerate life and the Earth's beauty, while imposing ideas of fear, guilt, and control. This great sacred mountain certainly does not wallow in such limiting, life-denying concepts nor does it require or support humans in doing so Croagh Patrick was - and still is - a place to experience and give thanks for the exquisite beauty of life.

(Thanks to scaredsites.com for the above info)

I went on the pilgrimage last year as I have done for many years. It's a bit of a family tradition since I was a child. Enjoy the pics.

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Some of Clew Bays 365 islands
Some of Clew Bay's 365 islands
Clew Bay through Clouds
Clew Bay through Clouds
Clew Bay minus clouds
Clew Bay minus clouds
Veiw down to Clew bay
Veiw down to Clew bay
Bethra Strand & Clew Bay, from top…
Bethra Strand & Clew Bay, from to…
Barefoot Climber
Barefoot Climber
Clew Bay
Clew Bay
Bethra Strand
Bethra Strand
Rainbow
Rainbow
Sunlight breaking through
Sunlight breaking through
Cloud Cover.
Cloud Cover.
Cloud rolling in
Cloud rolling in
Chapel on top of Croagh Patrick
Chapel on top of Croagh Patrick
People on the pilgrimage
People on the pilgrimage
Sun rays through the cloud.
Sun rays through the cloud.
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photo by: maithanfear