STIRLING, UK

Stirling Travel Blog

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on top of william wallace memorial
This was my favorite part of this trip :)

we took a train to stirling. it was a 5 pound round trip. we ate at a breakfast at this diner near my hostel. my boyfriend had a cheese burger and i had mac and cheese with chips.

the train ride was smooth. the view of the scotland country side is beautiful. it took about an hour to get there.

we took the "city of stirling" bus tour. it was 9 pounds all day. you can get off at any stop and get on whenever you like. we saw the william wallace memorial and ate lunch at this pub in the middle of town. we ate haggis and steak and ale pie. we did not have time to see the castle. it was getting late. next time.

i have always wanted to visit here. i am a big movie and medival history buff. i love the movie "braveheart" mel gibson played the scottish hero, william wallace.
he is the country's hero.

Stirling is a city and ancient burgh, in the Stirling council area of Scotland.

The city is clustered around a large castle and mediƦval old-town. It is a centre for government, retail, and light industry. Its population (as of the 2001 census) was 41,243, making it the smallest city in Scotland.

A former capital of the Kingdom of Scotland, Stirling was a royal burgh until 1975. In 2002, as part of Queen Elizabeth's Golden Jubilee, Stirling was granted city status.

Stirling is renowned as the Gateway to the Highlands and is generally regarded as occupying a strategic position at the point where the flatter largely undulating Scottish Lowlands meet the rugged slopes of the Highlands.
The starkness of this contrast is evidenced by the many hills and mountains of the lower Highlands such as Ben Vorlich and Ben Ledi which can be seen to the northwest of the city. On the other hand, to the east of the city, the Carse of Stirling is one of the flattest and most agriculturally productive expanses of land in the whole of Scotland.

The land surrounding Stirling has been most affected by glacial erosion and deposition. The city itself has grown up around its castle which stands atop an ancient volcanic plug a major defensive position, which is, in turn at the lowest crossing point on the River Forth. Stirling stands on the River Forth at the point where the river widens and becomes tidal. To the east of the city the Ochil Hills dominate the skyline with the highest peaks in the range being Dumyat and Ben Cleuch. The Ochils meet the flat floodplain of the River Forth to the east of the distinctive geographical feature - Abbey Craig, a crag and tail feature upon which sits the 220ft (67m) high Wallace National Monument.

The climate of Stirling differs little from that of much of the rest of central Scotland. Warm, unstable air from the Atlantic Ocean is the predominant influence, with a prevailing southwesterly wind.



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on top of william wallace memorial
on top of william wallace memorial
view of stirling from the william …
view of stirling from the william…
wallace sword
wallace sword
william wallace statue
william wallace statue
famous stirling bridge
famous stirling bridge
view from the city bus tour
view from the city bus tour
scotland version of red bull
scotland version of red bull
Stirling Restaurants, Cafes & Food review
my second time to have haggis. this was served in a traditional way. it was was vote "best pubs in scotland 2005" Another attempt to create an aut… read entire review
Stirling
photo by: ulysses