Sightseeing

Moscow Travel Blog

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Novodevichy Convent

I could not believe this was my second last day in Russia! I was already beginning to miss Russia. At the same time, I was missing the comfort of life back home. Travelling can be exhausting. Anyway, I was determined to enjoy the rest of my time in Russia as much as I could. And I did.

The places I visited/saw today are: Novodevichy Convent, Luzhniki Sports Complex, Luzhniki Market, Vorobyovy Gory, VDNKh and the Monorail.

Firstly, I went to the Novodevichy Convent. The Novodevichy Convent is one of the biggest religious attractions in Moscow and is also noted for being a UNESCO World Heritage site. Its cathedral is lavishly decorated, and the golden altar with intricate icons is breathtaking.

Monorail has arrived!
Some famous people like Anton Chekhov and Nikita Khrushchev are interred in the cemetery of the convent.

Secondly, I walked over to Luzhniki Market, through which you can reach Luzhniki Sports Complex. Luzhniki Market was a site of violent clashes between skinheads and traders from Caucasus a few years ago. Nowadays, the security checks have been installed on the premise, and the market was relocated indoor. There is nothing interesting for travellers here, but everything from food to clothing is very cheap here. There are a few outdoor cafes and food stalls, where you can have cheap but very filling food. I had some pilaf (called "plov" locally) with shashlik and salad. The whole package cost me 100 roubles! There are also stalls where they sell shaurma (doner kebab), bliny (Russian pancakes), hotdogs and beer.

Putin
This is one of the cheapest places I found in Moscow, where you can enjoy local food.

Next, I wondered around Luzhniki Sports Complex and continued on to the other side of the river, Vorobyovy Gory. Vorobyovy Gory is the site of Moscow State University, which is an attraction in itself. Vorobyovy Gory provides a breathtaking view of the city, so it must be visited while in Moscow. There are some vendors selling souvenir, and it is a popular spot for newly-wed couples to take pictures.

After that, I went to VDNKh, which is nowadays called VVC, to take the Monorail. VVC may no longer be part of most tours in Moscow, but it is still popular with Moscovites during holidays. It was meant to be an expo featuring all the former Soviet republics, but nowadays it is an amusement park with shops and restaurants.

Some Stalinist Architecture at VVC
The Stalinist buildings, which used to exhibit the products and technology that were the pride of the Soviet Union, now house small shops, selling everything from mobile phones to Russian souvenir. There is a tiny museum inside the Central Pavillion, amid shops and cafes, celebrating Russia's diversity. You can find different ethnic traditional clothes, photographs, paintings and lots of Putin images!

The Monorail starts from VDNKh, connecting to Timiryazevskaya Metro station. Frankly speaking, I was disappointed by the Monorail. It was of no practical value and very touristy (but only popular with the locals. When a monorail appeared, everyone started taking photographs. It would have been okay if the Monorail meandered through an interesting neighborhood, but it is located in northern Moscow, which is not particularly a pretty area. The only exceptions are the Sheremetev's palace and the Ostankino TV Tower. Both were visible from the Monorail.

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Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Monorail has arrived!
Monorail has arrived!
Putin
Putin
Some Stalinist Architecture at VVC
Some Stalinist Architecture at VVC
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Karelia at VVC
Karelia at VVC
Armenia at VVC
Armenia at VVC
Ostankino Tower from Monorail
Ostankino Tower from Monorail
Moscow
photo by: eefab