BACK IN HONNINGSVAG AND GOING TO NORTH CAPE

Honningsvag Travel Blog

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north cape horn

I went to bed at 3am this morning. I had to be up by 5am. I stayed up to watch the aurora borealis till 2am. It was beautiful; there were streaks of white with green and red. The sky was getting brighter as it gets close to morning. it was worth staying up all night. it was breathtaking.

 

I woke up at 5:30am. I had green tea to wake me up. We boarded the bus bound for Honningsvag to see the North Cape, the most northern point of Europe, 71 degree 10’ 21” and large parts of west Finnmark.

 

We are back again to Honningsvag. We are doing the North Cape tour or Nordkapp in Norwegian is on an island called, Mageroya.  The drive is 45min to North Cape on the North Cape rd. E6.  The view is similar to Denali national park in Alaska.

the drive to north cape
Our first stop was the view of North Cape Horn. We arrived to North Cape at 7am. There was nobody there but us 3 bus loads of people. It was a good day to take pictures at the North Cape.

 

On the grounds of North Cape, I took pictures of the “children of the earth” it is a monument created in 1989 by seven children from different parts of the world to symbolize cooperation, friendship, hope and joy across all borders. The countries are Tanzania, Brazil, Japan, Thailand, Italy, Russia, and U.S.A. The sculpture “mother and child” is the work of the artist, Eva Rybakken. I took pictures of the grounds.

the drive to north cape
Since the monument was erected in 1989, North Cape was hosted the annual award of the children of the earth prize. The money prize is awarded to an organization or project that works to improve children’s living conditions.

 

The famous “the globe”, this monument has become the symbol of North Cape. It was windy and cold when we arrived there.

 

The Oscar memorial, a stone memorial raised by King Oscar II of the union of Norway and Sweden in 1873 to mark the union’s northernmost border.

 

The part of the tour is breakfast on the North Cape. We had traditional Norwegian breakfast at the “kompasset” restaurant with panoramic view of the North Cape.

the “kompasset” restaurant
I went to the souviener shop. I wanted to see if they had a beanie or a “Norway” jacket. Of course the prices are high. I did however found a beanie I liked. It was only 85 kroner ($16). It is the same building that is the entrance underground to the supervideograph, tunnel, St.John’s chapel, Thai museum and viewing room.

 

The supervideograph, it’s a wide-screen 125’ panorama film showing the landscape around North Cape through the four seasons. The movie is about 20 min. that movie made me want to come back to visit in the winter time.

 

There is a tunnel underneath the restaurant, the niche displays show 3-diamensional tableaux from the history of North Cape.

 

If you want to get married in the North Cape, St. John’s chapel is there.

the point
It is a small chapel. It fits about 6 people.

 

The Thai museum was opened in 1989 in memory of King Chulalongkorn of Siam (now Thailand) and his visit to North Cape in 1907.

 

King Chulalongkorn (Rama V) of Thailand (formerly Siam) was given a heartly and warm welcome when he arrived at Christiania on 4th of July 1907 on the yacht "Albion". King Haakon greeted him in the Oslofjord on the boat "Stjernen". The people were crowding along the route as the two kings majestecly rode in a carriage from Piperviken to the Royal Palace

 

King Chulalongkorn and King Haakon became friends and laid the foundation for the good relations which now exist between the two nations.

 

Around Norway! After visiting Christiania the Thai King and his entourage journeyed througout Norway. Their trip took them all the way to the North Cape - where the King engraved his name on a stone.

 

Artists from the respective countries have collaborated designing medals which are sold in both countries; the proceeds will go to cultural projects.

 

King Chulalongkorns travel letters were later released in a book which is today part of the school curriculum for Thai students. The publisher Schibsted printed a version in Norwegian. A Thai pavilion has been built on the North Cape Plateau. Keen photographer, King Chulalongkorn took many photographs during his journey. Among his best photograps are his own portrait of King Haakon and Queen Maud.

children of the earth

 

We only had 45min. in North Cape. I don’t have time to go to the viewing room underneath the “the globe”.

 

We jumped in the bus. We were on our way to visit Niels, a Sami and his reindeers. He wear s his traditional Sami outfit. He and his family have capitalized the tourist industry in Norway. They have a souvenir shop, a Sami tent, a pen with a family of reindeer, organized the bus tours to see up close a reindeer but, do not touch the antlers or the reindeer. He lives across the street. He has a huge satellite dish, 4 cars, and house.

 

When the reindeers suffers a heat wave in Norway, which is 60 degrees. HAHAHAHA.  They would hide in the road tunnels to keep cold. Can you imagine 1,000 reindeers in a tunnel and you trying to drive thru? Well, the locals put fences and electric gates to keep them out of the tunnels.

children of the earth

 

The Sami people (also Sámi, Saami, Lapps, sometimes also Laplanders) are the indigenous people of northern Europe inhabiting Sápmi, which today encompasses parts of northern Sweden, Norway, Finland and the Kola Peninsula of Russia. Their ancestral lands span across an area the size of Sweden in the Nordic countries. The Sami people is among the largest indigenous group in Europe. Their languages are the Sami languages, which are classified as Finno-Ugric.

 

Many years of forced assimilation in the four countries makes it difficult to estimate the numbers of Sami. However, the population is estimated at about 85,000. The Norwegian state recognizes any Norwegian as Sami if he or she has one great-grandparent whose home language was Sami, but there is not, and has not been, any registration of the home language spoken by Norwegian people.

Roughly half of all Sami live in Norway, but many live in Sweden as well. Finland and Russia are also home to smaller groups located in the far north. The Sami in Russia were forced by the Soviet authorities to relocate to a collective called Lovozero/Lujávri, in the central part of the Kola Peninsula.

 

Traditionally, the Sami had a variety of livelihoods; fishing on the coast and in the inland, trapping animals for fur, sheep herding, etc. The best known livelihood is reindeer herding, but only a small percentage of the Sami have been mainly reindeer herders over the last centuries. Today, many Sami lead modern lives in the cities inside and outside the traditional Sami area, with modern jobs. Some 10% still practice reindeer herding, which for traditional and cultural reasons is reserved for Sami people in some parts of Nordic countries.

i left my stone art, that i was here.

 

Reindeer husbandry has been, and is an important aspect of Sámi culture. During the years of forced assimilation, the areas in which reindeer herding was an important livelihood were among the few where the Sámi culture and language survived.

 

Today, in Norway reindeer husbandry is legally protected as an exclusive Sámi livelihood, such that only persons of Sámi descent with a linkage to reindeer herding family can own, and hence make a living, of reindeer herding. Presently, about 2800 people are engaged in reindeer herding in Norway

 

Then from this point to Hammerfest is a 1hr 30min. drive. However, it was a breath taking drive. We were driving near the coast, the view of Porsangerfjoden to my left.

The trees have a autumn colors, just like the New England states in USA. On the way we stopped to take pictures of reindeer grazing freely on the land. I saw white reindeer. I never saw that before. Unfortunately, my camera was being uncooperative with me. I don’t have pictures of it. I miss shot when the white reindeer was crossing in front of the bus. We drove thru 3 tunnels. One of them was so long I thought we will never see the light of day. It was 2 tunnels that connect the island of Kvaloya, where Hammerfest is located to the main land and Mageroya, where Honningsvag is located to the main land. Then we took a snack break in Olderfjord. There and I quote the tour guide “the ugliest beach in Norway.”

 

Then we are back in Hammerfast. The ferry was leaving at 12:45pm.

We arrived at 12:15pm. I don’t think I had time to hike. I wanted to take a picture of me lying on the field of rolling hills, oh well.

 

I went to have lunch. Then when to my favorite area to blog and upload pictures, however, I was so tired from the night before that I passed out for 3hrs. We are bound for Tromso. We arrive at 12am. I should be taking a nap. We are going to a midnight concert at the arctic cathedral. I hope I can keep my eyes open.

 

sybil says:
i want to see the aurora boralis someday....
Posted on: Sep 22, 2007
Devika1985 says:
this is great!
Posted on: Sep 22, 2007
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north cape horn
north cape horn
the drive to north cape
the drive to north cape
the drive to north cape
the drive to north cape
the “kompasset” restaurant
the “kompasset” restaurant
the point
the point
children of the earth
children of the earth
children of the earth
children of the earth
i left my stone art, that i was he…
i left my stone art, that i was h…
north cape peninsula
north cape peninsula
the globe marking the point
the globe marking the point
King Chulalongkorn
King Chulalongkorn
niels, the sami, reindeer owner wi…
niels, the sami, reindeer owner w…
the racks to hang the dry the fish
the racks to hang the dry the fish
cute campsite dwellings
cute campsite dwellings
a trailer with a dish
a trailer with a dish
norways ugliest beach
norway's ugliest beach
damn trolls again
damn trolls again
the drive to hammerfest
the drive to hammerfest
the drive to hammerfest
the drive to hammerfest
Honningsvag
photo by: Paulovic