Waiting

Dakar Travel Blog

 › entry 24 of 37 › view all entries

Another Les Ambassades breakfast. I find myself going straight there when I sense a stressful day ahead. Though not exactly action-packed stress, let's just say today was filled with lots of anxiety.

I get to the World Vision office a tad early and go through the painful process of finding the person I am supposed to meet. Getting through the intimidating secretary helps when you give her the name of someone you are supposed to meet with.

After waiting a good hour and a half, I finally get to sit down with M. Monsofal. He's explains that he's been out of town and that most of the organization is doing budgeting and accounts this next week. Oh, crap. I keep smiling and try to keep the conversation going. Then, he suggests I get in touch with a few people, the first being Yvette Kinkpe - a women heading up a local project called Vitalis, working with talibé. She shouldn't be busy now. I try to be enthusiatic as possible without being overwhelming.

I head over to the other World Vision office in search for Yvette. I wait for another hour, but finally get to see her. Thankfully, she understands English, and I explain my case. (I swear, the pitch of my voice at that point had to make it sound like a life-or-death plea.) She says, "Well, I better explain to you a bit about what we do then." Yes!!! That means I can work with them! She gives me a great detailed rundown of the project's goals and tells me to come in tomorrow morning to go to a darra with one of her staff, Germain.

This burden is finally off my shoulders, just like that. I leave and head over to SIT, meeting up with Rothany, Chris, Lilli, and Amanda. Chris, Lilli, Amanda, and I head over to Les Ambassades for lunch. It's getting embarassing how much I go in there. The waitress see's me again and gives me a look between amused and "you're crazy." I probably am.

I take the opportunity to go with them to HLM. Again. But totally different. No freakouts this time, thank God. I just buy some fabric, and we find this nice lady to tailor some clothes for us. It's really such a fun day compared to my mentally-charged weekend.

As I am walking home, I see an older women in front of me who has the heels of her feet tattooed. Huh. It looks like the bottom of her foot is charcol black with pattered dots above it on her ankle. That's really interesting. It's rare that you see anykind of traditional permanent tattoo on women these days, when their ethnic tattoos can just be painted on for special occasions.

I really should have done a lot of preparation and research for my day with Vitalis tomorrow, but I couldn't pass up the opportunity to socialize and not worry about work. I know that's going to catch up with me when I can't find time and the power is continually going out.

Join TravBuddy to leave comments, meet new friends and share travel tips!
Dakar