Where the Rigans go on sundays

Jurmala Travel Blog

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Majori station

So, two days ago I had planned to go to a palace on this day, and I had visited a tour-company to book a tour to this palace, because it was very hard to reach by public transportation. The company registered me and told me that I should just show up at 10 o’ clock before their door. Ok, so I did. But when I arrived at their door this morning they told me that there were no more seats available to me. I didn’t really understand this, because I thought they had reserved a seat for me. So, my plan for today was thwarted. I was a bit disappointed, and desperate to get out of Riga, because I had seen the city already and I really wanted to go somewhere else.

All the other options for tours and day-trips were sort of impossible at this point.

Jurmala
I was wandering over the streets, and wondering what to do. Only one option was left to me: a day-trip to Jurmala, which was a beach community near Riga. I had decided before that I really didn’t want to go to some popular beach (I live near the beach all the time at home), but with a lack of anything else to do, I went to Jurmala.

And, you know? It was quite fun.

The train from Riga to Jurmala was filled with Russians. It seemed like every Russian west of the Volga wanted to go to this beach. Next to me were a young Russian man and his mother and they were very curious about me. I told them that I was from Holland, and since they had never met anyone from Holland they wanted to know all about me.
Majori beach
There was an immense language barrier, though. The young man spoke a little bit English, and he asked me questions while his mother urged him on, and was looking at me with twinkles in her eyes.

When I arrived a terrible thunder broke loose, and for the rest of the day I kept hearing thunder in the distance, but at dry periods I went up the beach and walked around the main boulevard in Jurmala. It is a place to see and to be seen. There are Russian signs and there is Russian music. I have never seen anything like this!

When I walked up the beach, I saw a large blue plate laying on the ground, and it said: “Welcome in the EU!”, but I couldn’t figure out for whom the text was meant to be read. Was it for the Latvians? (I know most are very happy to be part of the EU) Or was it meant to be read by the Russians, because they are visiting a beach in a EU country?

Besides the Baltic beach, which reminded me a lot of the North Sea right next to my hometown, there are lots of wooden German houses along the coast.
a really blue church
Some are renovated and painted, others are falling apart. They all have little towers and different color themes.

Later that day, while the thunder was still rumbling on in the distance, I went to the neighboring village Dubulti, which is on the same strip of coast. I just wanted to check it out, but when I exited the train, the clouds moved in bizarre shapes above me, the thunder cracked and the rain came down almost immediately. Dubulti was mostly lost to me, but one thing I noticed when I passed by was a curious Orthodox church painted bright blue.

By that time my legs had enough (I really should give them some rest) and I returned to Riga. The sea didn’t look that inviting, but I still had a great time. The atmosphere and big concentration of Russian people makes Jurmala an odd but interesting experience.

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Majori station
Majori station
Jurmala
Jurmala
Majori beach
Majori beach
a really blue church
a really blue church
Jurmalas boulevard
Jurmala's boulevard
German houses
German houses
Majori beach
Majori beach
Majori beach
Majori beach
Thunder in the distance
Thunder in the distance
Majori beach
Majori beach
German houses
German houses
Jurmala
Jurmala
German houses
German houses
Statue, but I forgot where
Statue, but I forgot where
Latvia
Latvia
Thunder!
Thunder!
a really blue church
a really blue church
Jurmala
photo by: EvaJ27