Shell Beach

Monkey Mia Travel Blog

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The barking fence

Heading from Kalbarri I get up there are not a lot going on and after a few hours driving I make a short stop at the Overlander Roadhouse - like almost everybody. The roadhouse is pretty isolated with its location 280k north of Geraldton and 200k south of Carnarvon and nothing much in between those two places - I guess this is the main reason why this is a major Greyhound bus stop and why so many people stop here on their journey to get petrol. The name has been quite familiar to me for a somewhat strange reason. Oddly this roadhouse appear on my old school atlas of Australia - I mean this is not a city it is not even a town - it’s just a gas station and it appear on my school atlas.

Closer look at the shells
I always wondered why but I guess it tells you something about how isolated this place is - they simply could not find something more interesting to put on the map than a roadhouse.

After getting the essentials at the roadhouse - read ice-cream - I turn off the main highway. I am going out on a short side road leading towards the sea. After a bit of a drive I get to the entrance to the Shark Bay World Heritage area. The area has become world heritage because of the unique wildlife and vegetation of the land and the sea around the land. But the local wildlife has been under pressure for many years by introduced European animals like rabbits, cats and foxes.

To protect the local wildlife in the area there has been a lot of effort put into eradicating the feral animals in the area. To prevent new cats, rabbits and foxes from getting into the area and replace the ones killed the locals have build a large fence all across the peninsula.

Mining the shells
There is only a tiny opening in the fence where the road is passing through the fence. To stop feral animals walking in through this opening there is a small grid which will stop cows and goats but cats might still be able to cross over. To discourage the cats the fence is equipped with a unique feature - a sound effect. When you drive slowly past the fence you’ll hear the sound of a crazy barking dog. It is a hope that this barking sound will scare off feral cats - I am not sure why it would scare a feral cat which most likely have never ever seen a dog - but the brilliant designers seems to believe all cats are afraid of dogs from birth.

On the way out across the peninsula I stop of at a small beach which is called shell beach. The name comes from the millions of shells which the beach is made of. There are shells in all kind of different sizes from the tiniest shells you’ll ever see up to decent size shells. The beach is pretty and the shells are so plentiful that they are actually mined commercially. It is getting dark soon so it is about time to drive the last bit of the road which will take me through the western most city of mainland Australia to a little resort which is sort of a city itself - the Monkey Mia Resort to spend the night.

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The barking fence
The barking fence
Closer look at the shells
Closer look at the shells
Mining the shells
Mining the shells
Shark Bay World Heritage area
Shark Bay World Heritage area
Shells en mass - so many they call…
Shells en mass - so many they cal…
Closer look at the shells
Closer look at the shells
The shells
The shells
The water and a few shells
The water and a few shells
Closer look at the shells
Closer look at the shells
Closer look at the shells
Closer look at the shells
The water and a few shells
The water and a few shells
Monkey Mia
photo by: rollerblading