Here we go again

Cape Range National Park Travel Blog

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Cape Range Lighthouse

I actually want to go diving one more time today - but things didn’t really turn out that way. The dive I wanna go to is not going today so I have to do something else. The city is not really a place to spend a full day. Instead I would like to go back to Cape Range one more time.

I met a group of divers from the Perth dive club yesterday and most of the group is heading out to go snorkeling with the whale sharks today. But one of them is staying behind and we agree last night we would head out to go snorkeling in the park. And we can borrow one of the cars they brought up when they drove from Perth to here a couple of days ago. So we head out for the 50k drive to the entrance to the park.

WW II insterlation
Out there we are told that it will soon be high tide.

We have been told that one of the best snorkeling spot are the Oysters Stacks - and it is best to go there at high tide or very close to high tide. So we hurry down there as our first stop of the day. We get there and since I already been to the national park a couple of days ago I consider myself an expert of the way the current will be in this area. Hence I suggest we hike down south along the beach and then snorkel out to the reef and let the current take us down the coast until we reach the point where we got down to the beach.

I manage easily to convince Leo that my plan is brilliant and we hike down the beach for a while. Until the beach is a bit too rocky to make further walking comfortable and we start to snorkel out towards the corals.

Tip of the peninsula with the US submarine communication towers
The corals are really nice - and it is quite relaxing to snorkel alongside them - especially because there are absolutely no current to push you towards any of the collections of corals - so no risk of getting smashed into the corals. We go snorkeling for a while and spend a bit of time at the edge of the reef where the waves from further offshore breaks at the reef. Out there the visibility is poor but the wave’s works a bit as a rollercoaster ride.

We swim back a bit and enjoy the corals. As we snorkel along the coral I understand why this place is best at high tide. The water is quite shallow and at several places you are only just a wee bit clear of the corals when you snorkel over them. At low tide you would just not be able to get over the corals at some places and you would risk getting yourself stuck in a dead end where you would have to walk over the corals to get back to the beach.

Cape Range Lighthouse

After spending some time in the water we head back towards the beach. And we get to the beach just within a couple of meters from where we went into the water. This means we will have a enjoyable hike back along the beach over a huge collection of uncomfortable rocks to get back to the point where you can get back to the parking lot.

From Oysters Stacks we head towards the Turkish Bay. I once more guess there will be a lot of current. This time I am correct - fortunately the strong current I experienced when I was here there days ago has not mysteriously disappeared in the mean time. So we do the only sensibly thing here. We walk down along the beach and then go into the water snorkel out to the corals and drift back along the beach. We end up going into the water a couple of times.

But even though the water is about 25 degrees warm it still turns out too cold in the end and we give up on the snorkeling bits.

Instead we start heading back towards the town. But as we drive along there are several kangaroos appearing along the road. And me being a mad tourist I want to hang out the window taking pictures of every kangaroo we see. I always find the locals got a bit of a problem understanding this kind of behavior as they see the kangaroos as more of a pest than like a cute animal. But Leo bears over with my desire to take pictures and I actually manage to get a decent shot in the end.

Instead of heading straight back to town we go out and explore an area with a small mangrove forest and a bird hide. The mangroves are always some strange kind of trees as they grove in the tidal area half in salt and half in fresh water. Out in the water are a few water birds. But the most common animals here are the biting kind so we don’t stay too long watching the birds - instead we soon head back to town.

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Cape Range Lighthouse
Cape Range Lighthouse
WW II insterlation
WW II insterlation
Tip of the peninsula with the US s…
Tip of the peninsula with the US …
Cape Range Lighthouse
Cape Range Lighthouse
Jumping away
Jumping away
Jumping away
Jumping away
Mangrowe trees
Mangrowe trees
Mangrowe trees
Mangrowe trees
Mangrowe tree roots
Mangrowe tree roots
Mangrowe tree roots
Mangrowe tree roots
Mangrowe trees
Mangrowe trees
Mangrowe trees
Mangrowe trees
Mangrowe trees
Mangrowe trees
Cape Range National Park
photo by: rollerblading