Hiroshima

Hiroshima Travel Blog

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A-bomb dome.

Hiroshima  

I was nearing the end of my journey in Japan, I only had 3 full days left, I tend not to count the last day in Japan when I leave for the airport.  So 4 days depending on how you look at it.  I hopped back on the JR line to Shin-Osaka station.  I was going to spend the morning in Hiroshima and the afternoon, evening, and the following day in Miyajima island.  2 hours later I arrived a Hiroshima station and paid 500 yen to store my 22 inch luggage in one of the lockers.  I went outside the station and took some maps of the Hiroshima area and the tram line.

  One of the best way to get to Genkaku (A-bomb dome), the peace memorial park or the museum is to use the tram which charges a flat rate of 150 yen to any destination, but I only went as far as the A-bomb dome tram stop.  The park is also a popular destination for school field trips.  I saw so many students visiting the park and museum.  It seems like a lot of fun, way better than the field trips I had when I went to school.   

The A-bomb dome felt surreal.  I couldn't believe I was standing in the area close to where they dropped the world's first atomic bomb.  But perhaps even more amazing is how the city of Hiroshima was able to rebuild to the city that it is now.  The park was so serene and peaceful, at the opposite end was the Peace Memorial museum, admission was only 50 yen, but I had to pay extra for the English headphone speaker guide.
  It was still a bargain.  The museum itself is 2 stories, there is a lot of history inside, you can read about the history of World War 2, how the atomic bomb was developed, and why the United States decided to use the weapon as well as why  Hiroshima and Nagasaki were chosen.  Near the end of the museum on the 2nd floor are several exhibits of clothing remains from the blast, wrist watches whose time stopped at 815 am when the bomb was dropped, burnt skin, hairs, and descriptions of the adverse reactions it had on the human body afterwards.  The museum strongly advocated the prevention and use of an atomic weapon of mass destruction and after this visit I strongly believe in it.  I hope weapons of mass destruction will never be used again.  I got a little emotional reading some of the stories in the museum, how families, husbands, wives, sons, daughters were lost or separated but I held my tears, and took it like a man.  The last thing I need is to have a cute looking girl seeing me cry, that would be embarrassing or maybe girls dig that sort of thing, guys who's a little sensitive.  Okay moving on...

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A-bomb dome.
A-bomb dome.
Clothing remains inside the museum.
Clothing remains inside the museum.
So many students going on a field …
So many students going on a field…
Hiroshima tram.
Hiroshima tram.
Hiroshima
photo by: mmeymey