Caesarea

Caesarea Travel Blog

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Aqueduct

I must admit we were too short in Tel Aviv, but the next day we left to north Israel and first went to Caesarea. Caesarea was a city and harbor built by Herodus the Great about 25BC. Today, its ruins lie on the Mediterranean coast of Israel about halfway between the cities of Tel Aviv and Haifa, on the site of Pyrgos Stratonos. Caesarea was named to flatter the Caesar. Herodus was a Jewish Roman client king of Israel. He is very famous because of his buildings, also in Jerusalem, but was also a very cruel madman murdering familymembers, opposers and rabbis. The city became the seat of the Roman praefecti soon after its foundation. In 66 AD, a massacre of Jews here and the desecration of the local synagogue led to the disastrous Jewish revolt.

Hippodrome
Roman emperor Vespasian declared it a colony and renamed it Colonia Prima Flavia Augusta Caesarea. After the destruction of Jerusalem, in A.D. 70, Caesarea was established as the provincial capital of Judaea Province before the change of name to Syria Palaestina. In 638 the city was conquered by the Muslims, and after captured 2 times by the Crusaders in the Middle Ages it became more and more deserted after 1265. Caesarea lay in ruins until its resettlement by Circassian and Bosnian refugees in the 1870s and 1880s. Their descendants were expelled during the 1948 War. In the 1950s and 60s, modern archaeology uncovered details of Crusader ramparts and the theater of the Roman city. More recent work has filled out the picture, still working right now which can be seen while visiting this old city.

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Aqueduct
Aqueduct
Hippodrome
Hippodrome
Threatre
Threatre
Old remains
Old remains
Tomb
Tomb
Mosque
Mosque
Arches
Arches
Louis IX wall
Louis IX wall
Louis IX wall
Louis IX wall
Old remains
Old remains
Caesarea
photo by: more_vnutri