Clootie's Well near Munlochy, Scotland - Day 2

Munlochy Travel Blog

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Clootie's Well near Munlochy, on the Black Isle, Easter Ross
Clootie Well

Our second stop was at the Clootie Well. This particular well was thought to be an area where they could cure sick children if they were kept there overnight. Clootie Well can be very significant to the Scottish, I guess depending on who you speak with at the time. This particular well was thought to be an area where people could cure sick children if they were kept there overnight. A Clootie Well are thought to be a pilgrimage Celtic area, often having trees glowing around the well or spring.
Rocks on the beach of Moray Firth in North Kessock
Apparently a "clootie" is a piece of clothe. The significance or the relation of the "rag" or "clootie" is to dug it in the body of water, then tying it to a branch, close to the well. This is done along with a healing ritual, for healing purposes.
View of Clootie's Well area just off the road.
At the entrance to the path towards the well, there was a plaque describing the purpose of the well; which is as follows;

Hope hangs in the trees here.
Every one of the cloots around this well is a token,
left by someone who wants a wish to come true.

Hopes hang in the branches

At this well people often use cloots
to make wishes for the healing, leaving an offering
that should have been in contact with the sick person.
It should also be something that will me away, taking the
sickness with it. It is suppose to be very bad luck maneuver
a cloot - you might get the sickness yourself.

Wells with magical properties like this were once common throughout
Britain. At some of them you leave clothes or rags; others need coins,
pins, shells or pebbles. They seem to be a link with pre-Christian
beliefs, and perhaps with the power of water in "Celtic" tradition.
Some wells have a particular time when they are supposed to
be most powerful; many people visit Munlochy's well
at Beltane, the Celtic festival at the
beginning of May.



Overall, it was a very unique place, but a little eerie as well. Our tour guide, Neil, said that some people weren't taking it too seriously and use it more for luck then anything else.
signedcutie says:
Yes I agree :o).
Posted on: Jun 07, 2010
Andy99 says:
Very interesting story about this folk tradition!
Posted on: Jun 07, 2010
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Clooties Well near Munlochy, on t…
Clootie's Well near Munlochy, on …
View of Clooties Well area just o…
View of Clootie's Well area just …
Stairs leading to Clooties Well
Stairs leading to Clootie's Well
Peoples contributions and wishes …
People's contributions and wishes…
Clooties Well
Clootie's Well
Stepping stones around the stream
Stepping stones around the stream
Cute little contribution to Clooti…
Cute little contribution to Cloot…
Clooties Well
Clootie's Well
Close up of the little stream.
Close up of the little stream.
Plaque at the entrance of the path…
Plaque at the entrance of the pat…
Munlochy
photo by: signedcutie