Day 5 and time for a rest

Ribadiso Travel Blog

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"Why walk when you can run!" Yeah, I've been asking this myself ;)

My room mates start taking off very early. As early as 3:20 a.m. Yeah, you read correctly. I woke up to the rustling sound of packing and getting dressed, looked at my cell's clock and it showed 3:20. My first thought was that my cell is broken, but I was too tired to check it out, and went back to sleep. I knew the American girls had set their alarm at 6:45 a.m. But no real sleep came over me again. My brain was alert, for I believed that it must be some time around 6 already. Well, it wasn't. It really WAS 3:20 a.m. and my cell is fine. I remember someone mentioning in a conversation, that some pilgrims walk at nights. They start off as early as 3 a.m., and walk until the late morning to make sure to get a place in their chosen albergue. I don't see the point in this.

Graves
I mean, it's pitch dark night, you don't see anything of the country, nor do you meet any other travellers. And you wake up your room mates :(

I wake up again around 6, and many are already up and getting ready to take off. But they are considerate, they keep it down, and lights are not on untill 7 a.m. Sharp. The albergue has an 8 a.m. curfew for check-out, so I get up, too. Still, I'm amongst the last to leave, and the container and hall appear kinda eerie now, so empty and silent. I go have breakfast in a bar across the street, and have to wait untill 9 for Sergio and Ana. I don't mind, for today I want to take a short route, 11 km to Ribadiso. The albergue there is supposed to be beautifully located by a river, and I do need some rest. 

On my way, I pass another bench with offerings, this time it's home made jam and chestnut cream, and cake.

So sweet! Today I also meet more fellow pilgrims: Corinna and Markus from Austria, Marc from France, and several others that I pass by. I get to Ribadiso around noon, and guess who I bump into? Right, it's Sergio and Ana. Now is this destiny, or what? They hand me my backpack, and we make arrangements for tomorrow. Then I sit on the terrace of a bar and enjoy some zumo, freshly squeezed orange juice. Corinna and Markus are also there, and we chat a little.

Shortly after 1 p.m. I go to the albergue. It's a public one, and check-in starts at 1 p.m., so I am the first guest today. The albergue really is beautifully placed at a river, with a lawn for picnic. The bed room, kitchen/common room and bathrooms are all in separate buildings, which used to be a medevial hospital.

This means thick stone walls, and low doors. Soon more people arrive, and I go have some lunch in a restaurant next door. Today I try the fried squid, which is to be found in every menu. The squid comes in perfect rings, and it's more fried than squid, actually tastes purely artificial. Of course, it's a supersize portion. Then I go have a shower. Now, the bathrooms are definitely made for summer. It's a building that has an opening between the walls and the roof, so you are practically outside. But the water is hot, and it's clean. Back in the bed room, it has filled up and people are still coming. I put my batteries to charge, and obviously need a charging myself - I fall asleep.

Two hours later I'm awake, just to find all the beds occupied.

With Kun, Manuel and Fran watching the rain
I meet Kun from Belgium, Rory from England and Rebecca from Germany. There's also a French family, mum, dad and three teenage kids. Quite impressive, teenagers walking on a pilgrimage with their parents, you don't see that every day, do you? Outside it's raining, and there isn't much to do. Actually, there isn't anything to do. At one moment I find myself standing at the door, watching the rain and talking to people. There are Fran and Manuel from Spain, and some other Spaniards, and yes, they barely speak any English. Kun interprets for me, but I can see that he is tired and I stop asking. Fran is a clown and makes everybody laugh. We get into a banter and tease each other's efforts to put a decent English (him) and Spanish (me) sentence together :D .
Outside Melide
It's amazing, despite the language barrier, I never really had any problems to communicate. 

Later, I want to go make a cup of tea in the kitchen. It's a big kitchen with 4 stoves. But absolutely not one single piece of utensil. Not even the tiniest pot. I go to the restaurant and get my tea and some cookies. There are other pilgrims having dinner, and I meet Stefan from Germany. We sit for quite a while and talk. He walked the whole Camino Frances, 800 km in 3 weeks. So did Kun, Rory and Rebecca, and now I see the difference between those who walked the whole Way, and us who walked just a small part: the long-walkers are quite, serious, reclused. Us, who walk for a week or two, are more talkative and ready to party. But not tonight. We are staying in a public albergue, and it's curfew at 10 p.m. The curfew doesn't mean you cannot come later, but it would be inconsiderate to your room mates to roam around the room while they are trying to sleep. And some albergues even lock the doors after curfew. So I lay in my sleeping bag and listen to the rain because I can't sleep. 


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Why walk when you can run! Yeah,…
"Why walk when you can run!" Yeah…
Graves
Graves
With Kun, Manuel and Fran watching…
With Kun, Manuel and Fran watchin…
Outside Melide
Outside Melide
Camino waymark
Camino waymark
Camino waymark
Camino waymark
Camino waymark
Camino waymark
Bunk beds in medevial albergues
Bunk beds in medevial albergues
This hole in the wall was right ne…
This hole in the wall was right n…
Ribadiso
photo by: vila