7.11.10 Ned home and Whycocomaugh, Cape Breton, NS

Whycocomagh Travel Blog

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Always sad when Ned leaves

 

 

7.11.10 Ned home and Whycocomaugh, Cape Breton, NS

 

We got Ned to the delightfully small Halifax Airport just as planned.  It was hard to see him go, but knowing we only have a month left and having experienced this so many times before, made the parting easier. 

 

I briefly Skyped with Ned and he’d arrived to the Houston Airport, so all is well.

 

We're headed toward North Sydney to catch the ferry tomorrow to Newfoundland!

 

We wanted to see the Eastern Coast of Nova Scotia, along the Atlantic ocean.

Foggy southeastern coast of Nova Scotia
  There were two surprises.

 

First, it was nearly wilderness down there.  Very desserted, very little traffic, few houses (although some off short roads off the main road), and next to no services for travelers.  We drove through the main town called Sherbrooke, which was the only one that had a discernible town, with more than four or five buildings.  I just expected more people along that lovely waterfront.

 

The second surprise along the “Marine Drive” was the fog which socked in the views of the coast.  It was very romantic and lovely, but I'll bet very different and sparkling on a sunny day. 

 

Heading north then toward Antigonish, the fog changed to an overcast sky and noticeably warmer. 

 

Cape Breton is really an island comprising the NW part of Nova Scotia.

Foggy southeastern coast of Nova Scotia
  It’s covered in trees and hills.  It has few roads, but the 2-lane highways are good.

 

We stopped at the Cape Breton Visitor’s Info after crossing the bridge.  The bridge is short- only like 20 yards long because most of the water crossing was on a raised roadbed of rocks.  It must be very shallow water there.

 

Our nice family campground with a pool is just off Hwy 102.  Apparently it was 100 degrees here last week until today!  I couldn't believe that!

 

Derrick in the office is originally from Wales and England and spends all winter in Mexico.  He kindly showed us to our campsite with a golf cart and helped us back in.  Campground cost $28 with tax for 2-way service and use of the dump station.  We cannot get over how much less expensive private campgrounds are than public provincial and national park campgrounds!

 

If I forget to add it, last night’s camp costs were $26 with tax (water/electric) and the night before in Charlottetown ended up being just $31 with tax.

 

So, it was a day filled mostly with driving.  The long detour to the southern coast was worth it because I was curious and now I know.

 

We stopped at a wonderful farmer’s store nearby and got dinner of corn chowder, scallop patty sandwich, fresh blueberry pie, chicken, and a homemade loaf of banana and chocolate chip bread!  Life is delicious!

 

We are so excited about our ferry to Newfoundland is tomorrow! 

 

 

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Always sad when Ned leaves
Always sad when Ned leaves
Foggy southeastern coast of Nova S…
Foggy southeastern coast of Nova …
Foggy southeastern coast of Nova S…
Foggy southeastern coast of Nova …
Funny little bus picks up kids for…
Funny little bus picks up kids fo…
Derrick at Whycocomagh Campground …
Derrick at Whycocomagh Campground…
Fun at the Whispering Pines campgr…
Fun at the Whispering Pines campg…
Fun at the Whispering Pines campgr…
Fun at the Whispering Pines campg…
Halifax Airport
Halifax Airport
Old-timey cars pulling trailers- w…
Old-timey cars pulling trailers- …
Whycocomagh
photo by: Theresa1101