Lamb and goats

Nairobi Travel Blog

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Group of Maasai- the colors in their clothing is incredible!
Sept. 16: Once again jet lag ruled my day. I woke up to about 500 different sounds, mostly birds. It was cool to hear, since its so different from the sounds Im used to, but irritating because I couldnt sleep through it. When I got up, we had tea and then Kakuta, Lapoppet, and Quenya took us to the school. Arent their names cool? Anyway, its a great little community. Theyre building dorms so kids dont have to walk so far every day. One dorm holds 80 kids and only costs a few thousand dollars! I was impressed.
We came back to camp and had breakfast and then I felt tired and slightly ill. So I went to rest and ended up sleeping until 3:45 (about 6 hours). Before resting, I learned what to do if you see a lion, so I dreamed that I stood up to one.
Merrueshi primary school
It was tight.
Finally Kakuta woke me up and we went on a walk to someones boma (fenced in house/goat/cattle/living area). On the way we were picked up by a truck. There really isnt a road and they drive fast and I was sitting in the bed, so I was holding on for dear life! When we got to the boma, I met a whole bunch of people, including three of the Elders. They are highly revered. We all crowded into this little hut to share roast lamb. It was ribs on a stick that they had roasted over the fire, and Kakuta used his ponga (big knife thing) to cut it. It was quite a scene. The lamb was very tasty, but it took me about 5 minutes just to chew the first piece! I learned how to strip every bit of meat off of the bone though. You have to bite into the sinewy part at the top and then sort of shred it down.
Pokey bush!!
MMMMM yummy! I got to go into one of the huts where they sleep and couldnt believe how small it was. I couldnt stand up and it was probably about half the size of my room, and my room is not big. The bed was made of cowhide and it was for four people. I cant imagine.
After all that, we went to see the goats and cattle they herd. They were so cute, and I got to hold a baby goat! We actually helped herd them into the kral (basically corral. Apparently thats where we get the word corral) made of dead, pokey bushes. One thing I noticed is pretty much all the vegetation here is pokey. And I mean pokey with two-inch-long thorns. So, one of the goats had this leather shield thing hanging from his stomach and I asked what it was for; turns out its basically a goat condom! Haha.
Had dinner, took a shower went to bed (after spraying a massive spider with bug spray to try to get it out of my hut!).
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Group of Maasai- the colors in the…
Group of Maasai- the colors in th…
Merrueshi primary school
Merrueshi primary school
Pokey bush!!
Pokey bush!!
A typical Maasai house
A typical Maasai house
Eating roast lamb
Eating roast lamb
Nairobi
photo by: easyjobrob