Day 183 (2): E.B.C. trek day 9, overnight in Gorak Shep (5164m)

Gorak Shep Travel Blog

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Yak dung, which is used for fuel

Thanks to the people I met here and/or travelled with: John (Scotland), Kirsten (Australia), Bernie & Barry (Australia), Dave, Sonja, Annabelle & Olivia (New Zealand), Martin (Germany)

Back in Gorak Shep I took a little nap. John and I had the idea to climb up to Kala Patthar, the small mountain looming over Gorak Shep, to watch the sunset. The walk this afternoon had drained me, but I was eager to climb up and take some pictures of Everest turning orange in the evening sun, so I made the most of my time off by resting.

Gorak Shep claims to have the highest Internet café in the world. Although the satellite connection is very expensive at 20 cents per minute, John and I spent five minutes updating Facebook, you know, just because the option was there.

Sunset on Nuptse in the mist
After this short break we set out to climb up the Kala Patthar.

We had decided not to climb all the way to the 5550m summit of Kala Patthar, after all, that was the program for tomorrow, so instead we walked up to the first ridge.
We were out of luck. The moment we started climbing mist rolled in to the valley, and by the time we reached the ridge Everest and Nuptse were completely obscured by the clouds. Bugger!
Occasionally the clouds would lift a little teasing us with a glimpse of the orange glowing mountaintops.
We had bought a beer, which we intended to crack open while watching the sunset, but the poor views, coupled with the extreme cold, made us pocket the beers again and start our descend.
The next day I spoke to a Czech guy who had climbed up all the way to the peak of Kala Patthar in the late afternoon and the peak had actually stayed above the mist for most of the time.
Sunset on Nuptse
His photos of Everest were absolutely amazing. Such a pity. If only we had left the lodge and hour earlier and climbed all the way to the top.

The night at the Yeti Resort was one of the nicest of the whole trek. Which is kind of ironic, since for most people the night at Gorak Shep is the worst, due to altitude, cold and occassional food poisoning. But I suffered from none of these, and instead I thoroughly enjoyed the evening at the common room of the lodge. Virtually everybody I had met during the last days stayed at this lodge. Among these people were a family from New Zealand, who were walking up to EBC with their two daughters aged 10 and 11. I was impressed, they seemed to really enjoy themselves, despite the lack of childlike activities or children in their age group. The father, Dave, had joined us for a few rounds of Presidents & Arseholes the other night, and his daughters, Annabelle and Olivia were keen on learning it too. For the occasion the game was renamed to Presidents & Clowns instead.

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Yak dung, which is used for fuel
Yak dung, which is used for fuel
Sunset on Nuptse in the mist
Sunset on Nuptse in the mist
Sunset on Nuptse
Sunset on Nuptse
Sunset on Nuptse
Sunset on Nuptse
Sunset on Everest (barely visible)
Sunset on Everest (barely visible)
John and I cracking open a beer at…
John and I cracking open a beer a…
Nuptse in moonlight
Nuptse in moonlight
Gorak Shep
photo by: Biedjee