First day in Lisbon - day 41

Lisbon Travel Blog

 › entry 48 of 57 › view all entries
Not too sure what they are so happy about. Maybe they just found the entrance to the trains.

Even though Lisbon, Portugal is a large city (it’s the capital of Portugal, and yet another city supposedly founded by the Phoenicians who must have really gotten around in those BC days), we thought we could manage without a formal tour.  After all we’d done pretty well in Barcelona which is another large city.  We thought we’d just take the train into the Praca Do Comercio (main commercial square and right on the waterfront) and then walk to a bus stop for one of those “hop on hop off” busses.  It sounded good but took us longer than it should have to find the train station.  On the bright side, in the process we did find some promising cafes on the waterfront near the ship before we finally figured out there was an underground entrance to get to the aboveground train.

Even the light posts pay homage to the Portuguese explorers


We finally made it onto one of the busses (which plays Fado music constantly) and rode around looking at the city.  Lisbon looks like nowhere else.  It was largely destroyed by an earthquake and rebuilt with many Art Noveau buildings stretched along grassy, tree-shaded parks.  The streets are wide and the shopping is wonderful.  There is a humongeous department store called El Corte Ingles which rated its own stop on the “hop on hop off” bus.  We hopped off and spent most of the afternoon in this and surrounding stores.  For once I didn’t buy books but I did help my husband find Mother’s Day presents for me.  (Every wife-and-mother reading this knows what I mean.)

Afterwards we walked down the hill to a restaurant named Gambrina near the National Theater for an early dinner before heading back to the ship. 

Crow1147 says:
Hi there.

That figure at the top of the light post has nothing to do with the Discoveries and is not paying homage to the Portuguese explorers.

That image is the main symbol of Lisbon and is around the city.

And represents one boat protected by two crows carrying the remains of Saint Vincent on its journey from Sagres to Lisbon, event of the XII century.

That symbol actually belongs to the coat of arms and the flag of Lisbon and its main representation exists as early as the XIII century, way before the Discoveries.

Saint Vincent is the patron of Lisbon since... ever lol. Even before the Pope's recognize Portugal's independence.



Posted on: Oct 02, 2013
Join TravBuddy to leave comments, meet new friends and share travel tips!
Not too sure what they are so happ…
Not too sure what they are so hap…
Even the light posts pay homage to…
Even the light posts pay homage t…
This is the cruise terminal
This is the cruise terminal
And this was a nearby street.  I o…
And this was a nearby street. I …
Lisbon decorations
Lisbon decorations
Mainly in a restrained Art Deco
Mainly in a restrained Art Deco
Lunch
Lunch
Our waiter and my husband
Our waiter and my husband
An octopus tonight.
An octopus tonight.
Typical street near the National T…
Typical street near the National …
The bullring
The bullring
Another side of the bullring
Another side of the bullring
Lisbon
photo by: Johnpro