Caribbean flavor and more turtle crawling.

Livingston Travel Blog

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Low cloud cover along Rio Dulce.

Hello all,

Well it was night two sleeping on the catamaran last night, and it was pretty much a carbon copy of the previous night.  It rained on my feet, I would close the hatch, I would open it again, it would rain again, close hatch.  Then another wake up to the sounds and smells of breakfast coming from the adjoining cabin.  Body inventory shows I got maybe five bites overnight, so that's not so bad I guess.  I wasn't hungry after last nights massive dinner, but after everybody else ate breakfast the crew threw the lines back onto the boat and we were off for Livingston.

Livingston is typical of many Caribbean towns in Central America, in that there was a strong British influence during colonial times.  The town is home to many Garifuna people.

Pretty river view after getting underway in the morning.
  The Garifuna are ethnically descended from Amerindians and the descendants of former African slaves brought from British Caribbean islands.  You are likely to hear Spanish, English, and the creole, indian, and French influenced Garifuna language in the streets.  We arrived at maybe 9am, and it was hot.  This was the kind of hot that has sweat pouring from your pores when you are standing still.  And there was no breeze at all, so that didn't help either.

We were dropped off at a hotel dock, and made our way up the main streets and back.  We settled on a restaurant to get some liquados.  We picked this restaurant because of the 10 or so oscillating fans that were scanning the room, and it did seem to help a bit with the stifling heat.

This gives you a pretty good idea how tall these cliffs are.
  I had a pineapple/strawberry with milk and sugar, and it was cold and refreshing to be sure.  Halfway through our stop, the power went out in the city.  This is not an unusual occurence in Central America, and the restaurant was fully set-up with it's own generator which shortly got things going again.

After getting back to the boat, we all stayed stuck under the canopy and searched for the short puffs of breeze that occasionaly teased us.  After about an hour underway we pulled into a small tributary that seemed more populated by resorts then the rest of the area.  Rio Tatin gave us the opportunity to swim, kayak, and play for a while, and before we left we lathered up with shampoo and soap in the clean water in an attempt to cool down and feel better.

Ben and Joanna look on as we pull into Livingston harbor.
  After that we had a great lunch, fresh whole pan fried Yellow Snapper from nearby Belize purchased in Livingston.  I love eating fish this way, and the bones were not so bad in this variety.  Very tasty!

The next stop along the way was at a small hot spring along the side of the Rio Dulce.  The spring used to flow freely into the river, but now a brick wall enclosed the springs to intensify the effect.  The dingy dropped us off, but none of us were really feeling things.  Joanna and I both waded around in the hot water for about five minutes, and then waited for the dingy.  The rest of the way back through the Rio Dulce was spectacular, with high 100 meter cliffs on either side.  The jungle vegetation still reached all the way down to the river, beating the challenge of the sheer rock.

If you have any clue why this chicken/baby/man is either coughing up coins or eating corn please let me know.

The rest of the trip was a slow one as well.  The wind did pick up enough to raise the spinnaker on El Golfete, but we were certainly not breaking any speed records.  At one point we tracked two locals in the traditional dugout canoe passing us a disappearing into the distance.  It was relaxing and quiet if anything, and after mooring the boat within sight of the Rio Dulce bridge we had some dinner and settled down for the night.  The anchor point was within sight of a residence that had about 15 different watercraft parked in nice high-end marine-type garages.  The crew told us that the owner was the creator/president of the Guatemalan Pollo Campero chain.  The fast food business is good.

We stayed up past midnight enjoying the sea change in temperature that had happened.  Joanna even grabbed a jacket.  It was a glorious thing.  And even though there were a few mosquitoes around dusk, it was very pleasant.  I gave up on the poker playing and chatting around 12:30am and headed into the cabin for a nice night of hatch open sleep.

Later, Phil

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Low cloud cover along Rio Dulce.
Low cloud cover along Rio Dulce.
Pretty river view after getting un…
Pretty river view after getting u…
This gives you a pretty good idea …
This gives you a pretty good idea…
Ben and Joanna look on as we pull …
Ben and Joanna look on as we pull…
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If you have any clue why this chi…
Wonderful downtown Livingston look…
Wonderful downtown Livingston loo…
Christine waits on the dock in Liv…
Christine waits on the dock in Li…
A really nice place for a house on…
A really nice place for a house o…
A nice place near Rio Dulce with a…
A nice place near Rio Dulce with …
Livingston
photo by: jlchatham