Okavango Delta Bush Camping

Okavango Delta Travel Blog

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Praying Mantis
This was my first experience of a bush camp, as it was for most of the others.  Due to the fact that we would only have a fire to cook on we cooked a double lot of minced meat and onions at the campsite in Maun the night before.  Then all we had to do in the Delta was add the veg and one night we would have spaghetti bolognaise and the other we would add chilli to turn the remaining meat into chilli con carne.

The Okavango Delta is the largest inland delta in the world and the only delta where the water does not flow into the sea.  Instead all the water that flows into the delta evaporates into the atmosphere.  It is home to an abundance of wildlife and the use of the Delta is protected by a government funded trust.
In a Mokoro


To get to the Delta we had a three hour drive in a truck.  We then loaded all of our gear into Mokoros (similar to a canoe but sit very low in the water and are moved along using a pole).  Our polar then guided us upstream to where we would camp.  At first the Mokoro fetl very unstable and the top of the boat is only a centimetre or two above the water.  I soon learnt to relax and it was a pleasant, although very hot two hours.

There are of course no facilities at the campsite.   A hole acted as a toilet and a wood fire would be our cooker.  There were no showers and we couldn't use detergent as it would get into the water.  During the night we could hear animals around our tents and could hear the calls of elephants and leopards.
An elephant we met on a bush walk


We did three bush walks which was a very different experience to seeing animals from the safety of a jeep.  We saw herds of elephants, honey badgers, impala, buffalo and water hog.  We also saw giraffe and zebra, which we learnt that they often stay together because zebra have good hearing and sense of smell whereas giraffe have good sight thanks to their height.  The only annoying thing was the number of flys that constantly buzzed around our heads, which drove me insane!

We also went fishing using the Mokoros.  I had never been fishing before but managed to catch a fish on my first attempt.  That evening we went back out on the Mokoros to watch the hippos and the sunset.  When we first arrived the hippos started to swim towards us but they quickly lost interest and we could watch them as they floated about in the water.  The sunset was one of the best yet and a great way to end our last full day in the Delta.  That night our guides sang and danced for us then we performed a quick dance for them - the banana dance which Joli had made up.  They loved it and were singing it themselves all night.
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Praying Mantis
Praying Mantis
In a Mokoro
In a Mokoro
An elephant we met on a bush walk
An elephant we met on a bush walk
Termite mound
Termite mound
Our bush camp
Our bush camp
Frog
Frog
In a Mokoro
In a Mokoro
Somewhere in there are some hungry…
Somewhere in there are some hungr…
Our guides singing and dancing for…
Our guides singing and dancing fo…
Okavango Delta
photo by: Biedjee