Strike Out

Buenos Aires Travel Blog

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Gilberto Gil in concert!

I consider myself to be a fairly politically active person. Actually, I considerED myself to be a fairly politically active person. And now, after 7 days in Buenos Aires, I would categorize myself quite passive, from a country with an overall apathetic political sentiment. As I attempted to take the subte to class for the first time Thursday morning, Ashley and I turned the corner to find the entrance gated. As victims of a subte worker strike, we stopped for cafe y tostado con jamon y queso and then joined the thousands of commuters in a traffic jam more than comparable to the 75/85 connector’s daily rush hour. And yesterday, a group of us began our free day at the Plaza de Mayo to take a few more pictures of the casa rosada and consider the whole historical legacy of the place. When we arrived it was covered in demonstrators. The chicos del pueblo who had been walking from the Southwest of Argentina, claimed hunger was a crime in a country of such wealth. There were also employed and unemployed marching for rights, along with another group marking the 8th month since their leader had been kidnapped.

 

One integral factor of a culture that allows for development is a relationship between labor, business, and government. As a spectator it would seem as though this country has created a positive environment for political dialogue. Here the communication clearly exists. Whether it’s a screaming voice or a striking worker, there are people attempting to make change and approaching the government as a means to create this change. But as I watch a movie of Evita in the 1950s, yelling at the railroad strikers, calling them enemies of Peronism, I wonder if the relationship really is allowing for development?

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Gilberto Gil in concert!
Gilberto Gil in concert!