busted!!...it is the 13th after all

Windhoek Travel Blog

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Angola - newly created lakes by a new raised road has some benefits to the area, keeps water from running away and lots of locals were fishing

The next morning Elvis felt bad that I didn’t get any real food the night before as his cook had gone home ill apparently and I had pork and chips before I left in the morning, must had been a bulimic pig because there wasn’t much meat on it!  The next 90km was very slow on a rough broken up road that took over 2hours, I went off the road to side where I could because it was smoother.  I hadn’t filled with fuel before I left as I didn’t want a heavy bike for this rough section Elvis told me about.  I needed to preserve my repair holding the racking and I had run a strap under the rear sub frame the meant if the rear suspension was compressed too much the wheel would catch the strap as it done the day before.  There was no fuel to be seen at the next town and asked a local on a small chicken chaser bike and off we went to the local mobile phone mast.

racing the train
  The two guys looking after the generators sold me 20litres through the chain linked fence for 100Kansa a litre instead of the usual 40Kansa (less than 0.40GBP) but still cheap and it will get me across the border as the towns I’ll be going through next closer to the Namibian border may not have fuel as it’s so cheap and people fill up before crossing the border.  This turned out to be true but I managed to top up right at the border, the last chance.  After I topped up with the 20litres is was an excellent raised tarred road.  This trapped the rain fall and created large flooded areas with trees partly submerged and long green grass.  Normally you’d think what a problem this road has created but here the locals blocked the large water pipes passing under the road to let the water build up behind then release it to catch fish swept through in nets place around the mouth of the pipe.
Watch out for wart hogs
  Trapping the water by the road seemed to helping the locals, also good for driving your car into for washing it I saw.  

I had some kid trying to help me cross the Angolan border and I could smell the booze from him, trying to act as if he knew everything and generally pissing me off.  He was even a the Namibian side of the border and had a sharp word with him, I explained if he wanted to business at the border he should not be smelling of drink then people might trust him, he took it onboard and left me.  Now crossing in Namibia has a big change, they drive on the left hand side and I’ve spent most of my life on this bike riding the right.  I ripped off a strip of material and tied it to my right mirror to remind me I’m on the right hand side, took a bit of getting use to, funky junctions are the difficult ones.

and these things...
  You could see a big change in the standard of living in Namibia from the shops, some I recognised and the people walking around.  From here on in I should be able to get quality things I needed fairly easily. 

It wasn’t long until I met my first copper, a rude man but I could say too much as I didn’t have valid insurance, only my forged ones still.  Hmmmm, the police up north were nicer than him.  It also wasn’t long until the kids started waving at me again and that put a smile on my face, kids are generally the same everywhere.  The roads here are in very very good condition compared to what I’ve been use to and also extremely straight.

the long road into the Kalahari desert
  I was in a world of my own thinking about what I could write for a friend Squiggs wedding to be read out back home that I’ll miss this month and waved to a group of kids sat under a tree when a traffic policeman waved at me, BUSTED!!  I knew I was over the limit and had been wandering if they checked for speeders, ahhhh that’s why the car up the road flashed his lights at me, not to saying hello to a biker but slow down!  He was pleasant enough and showed me I was doing 80 in a 60kmph zone, I could only apologise (I didn’t have my head light on either he said, this is the law in some countries).  I was in for 150N$ ticket that I would have to double back and pay it at the station getting a receipt, no chance of doing a runner then as this was the only road out of here and he’d know I was doing a runner if I continued south.  You have to be careful what you say if you want to pay a bribe instead, never come out and say it straight or they my try and have you for trying to bribe them, same with dealing with all sort of officials.
lightening in the Kalahari desert
  I asked if it was possible to pay the fine another way (not a bribe but still paying the fine), if it is possible to pay a fine without getting as receipt.  He thought for a moment looking at his ticket book and then me, then said I could pay him the fine.  I agreed as I didn’t want the hassle of going back to town, plus I broke the law and had been caught far and square, this wasn’t a scam.  He dropped the fine(bribe!) to 100N$, even better!  And said that was fair but he then started to write down my details and I told him if he wrote my details down then I’d have to go back to town and get a receipt.  He paused, smiled and said “ok”.  The bribe handed over I was heading south again keeping a close eye on my speed.  

I stopped in a town just north of Windhoek for the night, got my regular half a litre of diesel in a water bottle and cleaned the oily dusty grime off the chain and sprockets, only 10,000km and my front sprocket was on its was out again, sharks teeth it’s called, the ride south was hard on it and the whole bike.

Dusk in the Kalahari desert
  The problem with the bike losing power seemed to getting much better, maybe the card or it was bad quality fuel in Angola.  The next day I visited a KTM dealer in Windhoek that Paulina had found for me, decided it was worth a visit just to be sure before crossing the Kalahari Desert.  Discussing it with him he also thought it could be a problem with the carb and was worth checking to be sure, maybe a needle wearing out but had no time for about a week to look at it.  I decided to push out of Windhoek and get closer to the Botswana border for a Kalahari crossing the next day.  On the way a stopped to let a dark thunder storm pass as I could see the lightening flashing ahead of me.  I waited for almost an hour when I had to push on before it got dark, with my water proof lining between my motor cross shirt and body armour I set off.  The wind picked up and the rain got very heavy, I was riding just inside the long edge of the storm and I open the throttle to 120kmph to push past it, it took a long time and I was getting that cold water running between the legs giving a chill where men are sensitive!  This was a big storm passing and it rained right up to Gobabis where I stopped for the night.

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Angola - newly created lakes by a …
Angola - newly created lakes by a…
racing the train
racing the train
Watch out for wart hogs
Watch out for wart hogs
and these things...
and these things...
the long road into the Kalahari de…
the long road into the Kalahari d…
lightening in the Kalahari desert
lightening in the Kalahari desert
Dusk in the Kalahari desert
Dusk in the Kalahari desert
Windhoek
photo by: v10