Day 8 (Luqman) - Guest blogger is back

Buenos Aires Travel Blog

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I know they look innocent, but they are obviously plotting on their next kill...

So the guest blogger is back, taking some of the slack off of Miss Hannah and offering my new perspective.  And for the record, I have been informed that my different perspective is only from about 3-5 inches higher than Hannah’s, which is not all that different, so let the record be corrected.  Moving along, I definitely wanted to help Hannah with the blog from yesterday (Thursday, May 10th) but she refused me access.  I wanted to discuss it because though the day was filled with futile searches for different goods and cultural neighborhoods, I did get some enjoyment out of it, though it is quite childish (I don’t care).  It just so happens that Buenos Aires has dogs everywhere as mentioned, and of course, nature must take its course…all over the city.

The beautiful mosque and Islamic learning Center in Buenos Aires
  So keeping one’s shoes clean is quite an arduous task.  It is similar to walking through a mine field all day.  Of course the potential results from failure are different in a real mine field, but the mental fortitude required to keep your legs and your dignity are one in the same.  Well, one of my comrades took a loss on Thursday.  It just so happened that our own Miss Hannah Cho, Madame 1500 herself, stepped into some dog dynamite on Thursday.  The thing that was really funny to me was that the bomb seemed camouflaged.  I didn’t even really see it until Hannah bit the dust.  It was a sandy color, like it was a chameleon or something.  I joked with Hannah saying that I could hear the dogs discussing their plan of attack.
Luqman in front of the small Spanish getaway restaurant where the Flamencos roam
  I bet they were eating tofu dog food and broccoli and everything and drinking extra water just to get their camouflage doo-doo like that.  Then I can see them laughing after dropping the bomb, just knowing it would happen.  Then they probably hid in an alley, knowing that some poor victim like Hannah wouldn’t see it and lose a leg.  I can see them rolling over in laughter as we walked away, feeling accomplished.  As you can see, I have quite an imagination at times, but this moment changed my trip.  In addition to cultural exposure and self-growth and realization, another priority of my trip became to avoid stepping in any dog mess for the rest of the trip.  I just couldn’t.  I had too much riding on it, and I gave Hannah hell about the whole thing.
Guy from Desperado and my dancing heart throb dance the night away.
  My existence had a purpose now, and darnit, I was up to the task.  But that leads me into Friday’s occurrences. 

 

Friday started off with a good run.  I knew my purpose and got some great personal time in seeing more of the sites around our apartment.  I found that many of the things passed in the tour (The Law School, Flower monument, San Martin statue) were very close to our home.  I didn’t take my camera, but I will next time as it was a very good experience.  I decided to run up to Recoleta where we went to the first market.  There I saw my very first Argentine protest.  It was great.  There were marchers, police escorts, bull horns, and even a few fire crackers or flares.  The best part is that I had no idea what they were protesting, but I was sure against it.  Whatever they need, I hope they get it and now, damnit!!  As long as they weren’t arguing for dog’s rights to ruin shoes whenever they wanted, I was for it.  Reenergized by my dose of daily democracy and freedom to meaninglessly assemble, I finished up my run and headed home.  As it was Friday, I rushed home so I could get back to the mosque by 2.  I went to the Juma’ah service at the Mosque, which is absolutely beautiful on the inside and outside.  Judging from the caliber of vehicles in the parking lot, I assumed many of the patrons were diplomats from the Middle East.  Though I didn’t understand a word as it was delivered in Spanish and Arabic, it was still a very welcoming and lovely environment, showing that Muslims are equally hospitable in all corners of the world.    I stopped at the store next to the mosque on the way home to learn that it was also like a mall in that it had several nice stores including a Wal-Mart like store.  Lastly, a stop at the local fruit stand was successful in that I bartered goods for tender without Spanishly embarrassing myself.  (I know it is not a word, but you get creative with language after not knowing what is going on for about a week).  I got back to the apartment and crashed as I waited for the plans for the night.

 

Lastly, we decided that we would go to the Flamenco club to eat dinner and see a show.  Hannah had been before (she has been everywhere in the world, as she is really a 44 year old imposter who has mastered the physics explained in the movie Déjà vu allowing her to command 27 hours in every day).  I knew it would be a wonderful experience by the environment of the restaurant.  It was very cozy and nice and authentic looking (not saying much being an ignorant American) for a Spanish spot.  The menu for the night was appetizers, Tapas, and dessert.  Me and Brandon had no experience with Tapas but our Asian-Latino-American guide Hannah knew what to do and explained it to us.  We even half enjoyed them though everything was not the most appetizing.  My favorite was the crab empanadas and gumbo type rice and seafood.  After they marveled at how I could eat my food and theirs in such short time, the owner of the club came and talked to us, describing what was going on and how this was the oldest club of its kind in Argentina (started in 1901) she did some spoken word.  There is nothing like some deep, passionate, spirit tickling, soul shuddering monologue in a language you do not at all understand.  I guess it was kind of like watching the dirty channels late at night that are half way scrambled on basic cable.  You know something good is going on, but you can’t quite figure out what.  But after that experience, the dancers came out.  There was a couple to dance, a guitarist, a female vocalist, and a male drummer/vocalist.  Everyone was marvelous and very passionate about their wonderful performance.  It really did take us to back to Andalucia in Spain as the owner promised, and I proceeded to fall in love with the female dancer, who was excellent.  I ignored her extremely talented dancing partner, instead wondering how he went from a co-starring role as the friend on the movie Desperado to dancing in an Argentine restaurant.  But I was transfixed by the wonderful Flamenco dance and song.  It was like a mix of the Riverdance, Indian belly dancing and the tango.  This made for a wonderful night, complete with several “Ole” cries and subconscious “encore” requests to a certain half of the dance duo (these went unmanifested by the way).  After applying heavy peer pressure on Hannah to finish her second half bottle of wine, we left for the apartment.  I saw the fruits of my labor as Hannah joked about the apartment for a while before we all went to sleep.  It was a wonderful day indeed, complete with dance, spiritual ascension, sleep, and clean sneakers.  You have to love Buenos Aires.

rogue says:
"There is nothing like some deep, passionate, spirit tickling, soul shuddering monologue in a language you do not at all understand. I guess it was kind of like watching the dirty channels late at night that are half way scrambled on basic cable. You know something good is going on, but you can’t quite figure out what. "

My favorite part... Typical Luqman

I thoroughly enjoy your blogs...hilarious!
Posted on: May 14, 2007
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I know they look innocent, but the…
I know they look innocent, but th…
The beautiful mosque and Islamic l…
The beautiful mosque and Islamic …
Luqman in front of the small Spani…
Luqman in front of the small Span…
Guy from Desperado and my dancing …
Guy from Desperado and my dancing…
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