Moon Hill

Yangshuo Travel Blog

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Chinglish at the bottom of Moon Hill
Yesterday Bill and I hiked Moon Hill.  We'd been told by more than a few travelers that it's eight hundred steps to the top.  The first time or two I heard it I thought they were counting their steps, or trying to give some measure of distance.  By the third or fourth person though, I realized they must really mean eight hundred steps.  And yep, it's exactly that.  Eight hundred steps.

Two others recommended veering left at the top when you get to the "do not enter" sign; they said it made the hike all the more worthwhile.  Usually when I see a "do not enter" sign I don't question it.  Particularly when out in the wilderness and doing things like hiking on mountaintops.  Those signs are generally there with good reason.
Bamboo
  Would you jump off a cliff if your friends told you to?  When those friends are two well-seasoned travelers who know their shit, you bet I do.

All I have to say is this: if you find yourself hiking Moon Hill at some point, do yourself a favor and hop over that "do not enter" sign.  The trail winds further up along the peak and is the only "off roading" to be had, since it literally is just stairs all the way until that point.  It's a moderate trail, no big climbing or any of that.  And it is SO worth it.  It takes you to the very top of Moon Hill.  The views are SPECTACULAR.  So beautiful.  What was the point of all that step aerobics if not to make it to the top?

While I was sitting up there I wondered if the trail continued down the other side or not, so I peeked over the giant boulder I was sitting on and nope.
Eight hundred steps...
  Just a sheer, immediate drop straight to the bottom.  I believe that's what you call certain death.

From Moon Hill Bill and I walked back to the Eco Farm for a late lunch, clocking in I'm not sure how many kilometers for the day.  It took us just over two hours to reach the farm, and we were rewarded with a massive feast.  We had a big duck egg omelet with spring onions, fresh pumpkin and ginger, taro root with bitter greens, and heaping plates of rice.  Delicious.  Jaja (the owner) even let me pick my own persimmons to take for the road.  They're not nearly ripe enough for the Chinese, who eat them much softer (and sweeter) than the Koreans, but they are perfectly ripe as far as the Koreans are concerned.  Crisp and crunchy with a far more subtle flavor.  I like them both ways.  Looks like crisp and crunchy are on the menu this week for the hippopotamus and me.  Yum.
mikkismith says:
Where's the "more on Romana?"
Posted on: Nov 21, 2009
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Chinglish at the bottom of Moon Hi…
Chinglish at the bottom of Moon H…
Bamboo
Bamboo
Eight hundred steps...
Eight hundred steps...
View from Moon Hill
View from Moon Hill
Moon Hill
Moon Hill
Dont heed this bad boy.
Don't heed this bad boy.
View from Moon Hill
View from Moon Hill
View from Moon Hill
View from Moon Hill
View from Moon Hill
View from Moon Hill
Moon Hill
Moon Hill
Water buffalo!
Water buffalo!
Duck egg & spring onion omelet, pu…
Duck egg & spring onion omelet, p…
Yangshuo
photo by: sylviandavid