Great Britain, Scotland, Wales and the city of London 1982-1984

Tampa Travel Blog

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Tower of London, Home of the Crown Jewels.

Back in the eighties there was no such thing as digital photography. You had 35mm film and you carried around rolls and rolls of film. You had to be selective of the photos you took. Oh, you had to get your film developed and you did not know how your pictures turned out until you got them back.  In this digital age we live in we can get instant satisfaction. We can take as many pictures as we want and delete them if we do not like it.

Before going into the military I had never flown in a jet before. To me flying overseas was a grand adventure. My first thing I bought was a Canon AE1 35mm camera. During my 4 1/2 years being stationed in England and Germany, I took it everywhere with me. We got payed twice a month and I would pack a bag and off I would go to see and photograph something new.

#10 Downing Street

ENGLAND = I spent 2 1/2 years here and I was stationed at RAF Milldenhall. It was about an 1 1/2 hour train ride to London.  We would catch the train at Ely.  Once in the city you bought your day pass for the subway and off you went to see and do. It's been over twnety years for me since I have taken these pictures. I started going with a group of friends to London and that's how I started to learn my way around in London. Once I had confidence in using the subway and rail I started going by myself. I like to spend a little more time taking pictures. When your with a group you don't have the time you need.

BIG BEN - A clock tower was built at Westminster in 1288, with the fine-money of Ralph Hengham, Chief Justice of the King's Bench.

Big Ben

The present tower was raised as a part of Charles Barry's design for a new palace, after the old Palace of Westminster was destroyed by fire on the night of 22 October 1834.

The new Parliament was built in a Neo-gothic style. Although Barry was the chief architect of the Palace, he turned to Augustus Pugin for the design of the clock tower, which resembles earlier Pugin designs, including one for Scarisbrick Hall. The design for the Clock Tower was Pugin's last design before his final descent into madness and death, and Pugin himself wrote, at the time of Barry's last visit to him to collect the drawings: "I never worked so hard in my life for Mr Barry for tomorrow I render all the designs for finishing his bell tower & it is beautiful.

Big Ben
" The tower is designed in Pugin's celebrated Gothic Revival style, and is 96.3 metres (315.9 ft) high (roughly 16 stories).

The bottom 61 metres (200 ft) of the Clock Tower's structure consists of brickwork with sand coloured Anston limestone cladding. The remainder of the tower's height is a framed spire of cast iron. The tower is founded on a 15-metre (49 ft) square raft, made of 3-metre (9.8 ft) thick concrete, at a depth of 4 metres (13 ft) below ground level. The four clock faces are 55 metres (180 ft) above ground. The interior volume of the tower is 4,650 cubic metres (164,200 cubic feet).
 
SAINT PAUL'S CATHEDERAL -  The cathedral is built of Portland stone in a late Renaissance style that is England's sober Baroque.
St. Pauls Cathederal
Its impressive dome was inspired by St Peter's Basilica in Rome. It rises 365 feet (108 m) to the cross at its summit, making it a famous London landmark. Wren achieved a pleasing appearance by building three domes: the tall outer dome is non-structural but impressive to view, the lower inner dome provides an artistically balanced interior, and between the two is a structural cone that supports the apex structure and the outer dome. Wren was said to have been hauled up to the rafters in a basket during the building of its later stages to inspect progress.

The nave has three small chapels in the two adjoining aisles ��" All Souls and St Dunstan's in the north aisle and the Chapel of the Order of St Michael and St George in the south aisle. The main space of the cathedral is centred under the Dome; it rises 108.

St. Pauls Cathederal
4 metres from the cathedral floor and holds three circular galleries ��" the internal Whispering Gallery, the external Stone Gallery, and the external Golden Gallery.

The Whispering Gallery runs around the interior of the Dome and is 99 feet (30.2 m) above the cathedral floor. It is reached by 259 steps from ground level. It gets its name because a whisper against its wall at any point is audible to a listener with an ear held to the wall at any other point around the gallery. This works only for whispered speech - normal voiced speech is not focused in this way.

The base of the inner dome is 173 feet (53.4 m) above the floor. The top of the inner dome is about 65 m above the floor, making this the height of the enclosed space.

St. Pauls Cathederal
The cathedral is some 574 feet (175 m) in length (including the portico of the Great West Door), of which 223 feet (68 m) is the nave and 167 feet (51 m) is the choir. The width of the nave is 121 feet (37 m) and across the transepts is 246 feet (75 m). The cathedral is thus slightly shorter but somewhat wider than Old St Paul's.

The quire extends to the east of the dome and holds the stalls for the clergy and the choir and the organ. To the north and south of the dome are the transepts of the North Choir and the South Choir.

TOWER BRIDGE - In the second half of the 19th century, increased commercial development in the East End of London led to a requirement for a new river crossing downstream of London Bridge.

Tower Bridge
A traditional fixed bridge could not be built because it would cut off access to the port facilities in the Pool of London, between London Bridge and the Tower of London.

A Special Bridge or Subway Committee was formed in 1876, chaired by Sir Albert Joseph Altman, to find a solution to the river crossing problem. It opened the design of the crossing to public competition. Over 50 designs were submitted, including one from civil engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette. The evaluation of the designs was surrounded by controversy, and it was not until 1884 that a design submitted by Horace Jones, the City Architect (who was also one of the judges), was approved.

Jones' engineer, Sir John Wolfe Barry, devised the idea of a bascule bridge with two towers built on piers.

Tower Bridge
The central span was split into two equal bascules or leaves, which could be raised to allow river traffic to pass. The two side-spans were suspension bridges, with the suspension rods anchored both at the abutments and through rods contained within the bridge's upper walkway.

Construction started in 1886 and took eight years with five major contractors ��" Sir John Jackson (foundations), Baron Armstrong (hydraulics), William Webster, Sir H.H. Bartlett, and Sir William Arrol & Co. ��" and employed 432 construction workers. E W Crutwell was the resident engineer for the construction.

Two massive piers, containing over 70,000 tons of concrete, were sunk into the riverbed to support the construction. Over 11,000 tons of steel provided the framework for the towers and walkways.

Tower Bridge
This was then clad in Cornish granite and Portland stone, both to protect the underlying steelwork and to give the bridge a pleasing appearance.

Jones died in 1887 and George D. Stevenson took over the project. Stevenson replaced Jones' original brick facade with the more ornate Victorian Gothic style, which makes the bridge a distinctive landmark, and was intended to harmonise the bridge with the nearby Tower of London. The total cost of construction was £1,184,000.

PICADILLY CIRCUS AND TRAFALGAR SQUARE - The name commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar (1805), a British naval victory of the Napoleonic Wars. The original name was to have been "King William the Fourth's Square", but George Ledwell Taylor suggested the name "Trafalgar Square".

Trafalgar Square

The northern area of the square had been the site of the King's Mews since the time of Edward I, while the southern end was the original Charing Cross, where the Strand from the City met Whitehall, coming north from Westminster. As the midpoint between these twin cities, Charing Cross is to this day considered the heart of London, from which all distances are measured.

In the 1820s the Prince Regent engaged the landscape architect John Nash to redevelop the area. Nash cleared the square as part of his Charing Cross Improvement Scheme. The present architecture of the square is due to Sir Charles Barry and was completed in 1845.

Trafalgar Square ranks as the fourth most popular tourist attraction on earth with more than 15 million annual visitors.

Piccadilly Circus connects to Piccadilly, a thoroughfare whose name first appeared in 1626 as Pickadilly Hall, named after a house belonging to one Robert Baker, a tailor famous for selling piccadills or piccadillies, a term used for various kinds of collars.

Picadilly Square
The street was known as Portugal Street in 1692 in honour of Catherine of Braganza, the queen consort of King Charles II of England, but was known as Piccadilly by 1743. Piccadilly Circus was created in 1819, at the junction with Regent Street, which was then being built under the planning of John Nash on the site of a house and garden belonging to a Lady Hutton. The circus lost its circular form in 1886 with the construction of Shaftesbury Avenue.

The junction has been a very busy traffic interchange since construction, as it lies at the centre of Theatreland and handles exit traffic from Piccadilly, which Charles Dickens, Jr (Charles C. B. Dickens, son of Charles Dickens) described thusly in 1879: "Piccadilly, the great thoroughfare leading from the Haymarket and Regent-street westward to Hyde Park-corner, is the nearest approach to the Parisian boulevard of which London can boast.

Buckingham Palace
"

The Piccadilly Circus tube station was opened March 10, 1906 on the Bakerloo Line, and on the Piccadilly Line in December of that year. In 1928, the station was extensively rebuilt to handle an increase in traffic.

The intersection's first electric advertisements appeared in 1910, and from 1923 electric billboards were set up.

BUCKINGHAM PALACE - Originally known as Buckingham House, the building which forms the core of today's palace was a large townhouse built for the Duke of Buckingham in 1703 on a site which had been in private ownership for at least 150 years. It was subsequently acquired by George III in 1761 as a private residence for Queen Charlotte, and known as "The Queen's House". During the 19th century it was enlarged, principally by architects John Nash and Edward Blore, forming three wings around a central courtyard.

Buckingham Palace
Buckingham Palace finally became the official royal palace of the British monarch on the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837. The last major structural additions were made in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including the East front which contains the well-known balcony on which the Royal Family traditionally congregate to greet crowds outside. However, the palace chapel was destroyed by a German bomb in World War II; the Queen's Gallery was built on the site and opened to the public in 1962 to exhibit works of art from the Royal Collection.

The original early 19th-century interior designs, many of which still survive, included widespread use of brightly coloured scagliola and blue and pink lapis, on the advice of Sir Charles Long. King Edward VII oversaw a partial redecoration in a Belle epoque cream and gold colour scheme.

Stratford-upon-Avon
Many smaller reception rooms are furnished in the Chinese regency style with furniture and fittings brought from the Royal Pavilion at Brighton and from Carlton House. The Buckingham Palace Garden is the largest private garden in London.

STRATFORD-UPON-AVON - Stratford has Anglo-Saxon origins, and grew up as a market town in medieval times. The name is a fusion of the Old English strǣt, meaning "street", and ford, meaning that a Roman road forded the River Avon at the site of the town.

Stratford is also close to the Cotswolds, with Chipping Campden 10 miles (16 km) to the south. As a major sheep producing area (William Shakespeare's father, John Shakespeare, bought and sold sheep's wool illegally) the Cotswolds, up until the latter part of the 19th century, regarded Stratford as one of its main centres for the slaughter, marketing, and distribution of sheep and wool.

Stratford-upon-Avon
As a consequence Stratford also became a centre for tanning during the 15th��"17th centuries. Both the river and the Roman road served as trade routes for the town.

Had a mass German invasion occurred during World War II, the town would have become the temporary seat of Parliament, and hosted many state servants.

The first real theatre in Stratford was a temporary wooden affair built in 1769 by the actor David Garrick for his Jubilee Celebrations of that year to mark Shakespeare's birthday. The theatre, built not far from the site of the present Royal Shakespeare Theatre, was almost washed away in two days of torrential rain that resulted in terrible flooding.

A small theatre known as The Royal Shakespeare Rooms was built in the gardens of Shakespeare's New Place home in the early 19th century but became derelict by the 1860s.

Stratford-upon-Avon, Thatched Roofs

To celebrate Shakespeare's 300th birthday in 1864 the brewer, Charles Edward Flower, instigated the building of a temporary wooden theatre, known as the Tercentenary Theatre, which was built in a part of the brewer's large gardens on what is today the site of the new, and temporary, Courtyard Theatre. After three months the Tercentenary Theatre was dismantled, with the timber used for house building purposes.

In the early 1870s Charles Flower gave several acres of riverside land to the local council on the understanding that a permanent theatre be built in honour of Shakespeare's memory, and by 1879 the first Shakespeare Memorial Theatre had been completed. It proved to be a huge success, and by the early 20th century was effectively being run by the actor/manager Frank Benson, later Sir Frank Benson.

Stratford-upon-Avon

The theatre burned down in 1926, with the then artistic director, William Bridges-Adams, moving all productions to the local cinema.

An architectural competition was arranged to elicit designs for a new theatre, with the winner, English architect Elisabeth Scott, creating what we see on the riverside today. The new theatre, adjoining what was left of the old theatre, was opened by the Prince of Wales, later Edward VIII, in 1932.

WHITE CLIFFS OF DOVER - The are cliffs which form part of the British coastline facing the Strait of Dover and France. The cliffs are part of the North Downs formation. The cliff face, which reaches up to 106 metres high, owes its striking façade to its composition of chalk (pure white calcium carbonate) accentuated by streaks of black flint.

White Cliffs of Dover
The cliffs spread east and west from the town of Dover in the county of Kent, an ancient and still important English port.

The cliffs have great symbolic value for Britain because they face towards Continental Europe across the narrowest part of the English Channel, where invasions have historically threatened and against which the cliffs form a symbolic guard. Because crossing at Dover was the primary route to the continent before air travel, the white line of cliffs also formed the first (or last) sight of the UK for travellers.

The cliffs are composed mainly of soft, white limestones with a very fine-grained texture, composed primarily of coccoliths, plates of calcium carbonate formed by coccolithophores, single-celled planktonic algae whose skeletal remains sank to the bottom of the ocean and, together with the remains of bottom-living creatures, formed sediments.

Ferry's loading up to make the channel crossing to France
Flints and quartz are also found in the chalk.

White cliffs like those of Dover (but smaller) are also found on the Danish islands of Mon and Langeland or the coasts of the island of Rügen in Germany. The cliff face continues to erode at an average rate of 1 centimetre (0.39 in) per year, although occasionally ��" most recently in 2001 ��" large chunks of the edge, up to several metres at once, will fall into the channel with little warning. Visitors are, therefore, urged to remain at least five metres back from the edge.

SCOTLAND - After working on Friday, Pat and I packed up and headed off to the train station. Our goal was to take the train to Inverness, Scotland. On our way north we made stops at Birmingham, Edinburgh, and finally Inverness.

Loch Ness
It took us all night, sleeping on the train and a three hour wait at Edinburgh for a transfer to Inverness. We stayed at the Station Hotel. Our first stop was the tourist information building. We wanted to go to Loch Ness. What I can remember is the it was cold and windy. The country was beautiful and the lake was huge. It was a walking tour of the loch. We were with a large group of people. Everyone was having fun. This was the only time I visited Scotland. We were there only for the weekend.

WALES - Chirk Castle is a castle located at Chirk, Wrexham, Wales.

The castle was built in 1295 by Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March as part of King Edward I's chain of fortresses across the north of Wales. It guards the entrance to the Ceiriog Valley.

Chirk Castle
It was the administrative centre for the Marcher Lordship of Chirkland

The castle was bought by Thomas Myddelton in 1595 for £5,000. His son, Thomas Myddelton of Chirk Castle was a Parliamentarian during the English Civil War, but became a Royalist during the Cheshire Rising of 1659. Following the Restoration, his son became Sir Thomas Myddelton, 1st Baronet of Chirk Castle.

During the 1930s the Castle was home to Thomas Scott-Ellis, 8th Baron Howard de Walden, a prominent patron of the arts and champion of Welsh culture. The Myddelton family resided at Chirk Castle until 2004. Lieutenant-Colonel Ririd Myddleton was an extra equerry to Queen Elizabeth II from 1952 until his death in 1988.

The castle is presently in the ownership of the National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty and is open to the public between February and October.

Chirk Castle
The state rooms, towers and dungeons are staffed by well informed guides. The property is also notable for its gardens, with clipped yew hedges, herbaceous borders, rock gardens and terraces and surrounded by 18th century parkland.

a National Trust property, is a medieval castle. Two families are associated with the town and its castle, the Trevor family of Brynkinallt and the Myddletons.

Attractions in the town apart from Chirk Castle include a section of Offa's Dyke and the Chirk Aqueduct on the Llangollen Canal, built in 1801 by Thomas Telford. The Glyn Valley Tramway operated from here.

The Parish Church of St Mary's is a Grade I listed building. The current church building was begun during the 11th Century by the Normans, although it is believed that an older llan, dedicated to St Tysilio, had existed on the site.

Chirk Castle
Indeed, the current church was known by the dedication of St Tysilio until the late 15th or early 16th century, after which it was re-dedicated to St Mary. Today, the church is a member of the Open Church Network and participates in the Sacred Space Project.

Chirk was formerly a coal mining community with coal being worked since the 17th century. The largest of these collieries were Black Park (one of the oldest in the north of Wales.

 

vulindlela says:
Great blog!!
Posted on: Sep 13, 2009
vulindlela says:
So true!
One day we will say the same about digital.....
Posted on: Sep 13, 2009
sylviandavid says:
I liked the different pieces of memorabilia... neat. sylvia
Posted on: Sep 13, 2009
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Tower of London, Home of the Crown…
Tower of London, Home of the Crow…
#10 Downing Street
#10 Downing Street
Big Ben
Big Ben
Big Ben
Big Ben
St. Pauls Cathederal
St. Pauls Cathederal
St. Pauls Cathederal
St. Pauls Cathederal
St. Pauls Cathederal
St. Pauls Cathederal
Tower Bridge
Tower Bridge
Tower Bridge
Tower Bridge
Tower Bridge
Tower Bridge
Trafalgar Square
Trafalgar Square
Picadilly Square
Picadilly Square
Buckingham Palace
Buckingham Palace
Buckingham Palace
Buckingham Palace
Stratford-upon-Avon
Stratford-upon-Avon
Stratford-upon-Avon
Stratford-upon-Avon
Stratford-upon-Avon, Thatched Roofs
Stratford-upon-Avon, Thatched Roofs
Stratford-upon-Avon
Stratford-upon-Avon
White Cliffs of Dover
White Cliffs of Dover
Ferrys loading up to make the cha…
Ferry's loading up to make the ch…
Loch Ness
Loch Ness
Chirk Castle
Chirk Castle
Chirk Castle
Chirk Castle
Chirk Castle
Chirk Castle
Stonehenge
Stonehenge
#10 Downing Street
#10 Downing Street
Picadilly Circus
Picadilly Circus
Picadilly Circus
Picadilly Circus
Big Ben on the river Thames
Big Ben on the river Thames
Tower Bridge
Tower Bridge
Train Ticket
Train Ticket
Subway Ticket
Subway Ticket
Bus Ticket
Bus Ticket
Sting in concert at the Royal Albe…
Sting in concert at the Royal Alb…
Sting in concert at the Royal Albe…
Sting in concert at the Royal Alb…
Wimbledon
Wimbledon
Wimbledon
Wimbledon
Wimbledon -Martina
Wimbledon -Martina
Wimbledon - Martina
Wimbledon - Martina
Wimbledon - Chris Everett
Wimbledon - Chris Everett
St. Pauls Cathederal
St. Pauls Cathederal
St. Pauls Cathederal
St. Pauls Cathederal
St. Pauls Cathederal
St. Pauls Cathederal
American Embassy London
American Embassy London
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American Embassy London
Harrods is to London as Macys is …
Harrods is to London as Macy's is…
Cats!!
Cats!!
London, Zoo
London, Zoo
London, Zoo
London, Zoo
British Museum of Natural History
British Museum of Natural History
London Subway
London Subway
Buckingham Palace
Buckingham Palace
The Station Hotel, Inverness, Scot…
The Station Hotel, Inverness, Sco…
Train Ticket
Train Ticket
Pictures from the train, Scotland
Pictures from the train, Scotland
Pictures from the train, Scotland
Pictures from the train, Scotland
Loch Ness
Loch Ness
Fly Fishing
Fly Fishing
Fly Fishing
Fly Fishing
Pictures from the train, Scotland
Pictures from the train, Scotland
Pictures from the train, Scotland
Pictures from the train, Scotland
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photo by: ejames01