Kabankalan City Detour

Negros Travel Blog

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The mine next to the pier for Danjungan

I lingered before finally leaving Sipalay. I wished that I could've stayed longer, but like what Cathy said, if I wouldn't leave then I couldn't come back.  And I had a date to keep so I needed to move on.  Takatuka's boat transfer was supposed to be just until the river, but somehow I was brought straight to Poblacion Beach next to the highway, effectively giving me a 50% discount on the cost.   

To get to Danjungan, Joy had told me to take the bus to Crossing Remolyos, then a tricycle to the pier where a boat would be waiting.  The tricycle took me over a dirt road to a remote pier where we stopped near an abandoned copper mine.  At the small beach there were some people swimming so I felt less paranoid.

Kabankalan church
But there was no boat!  I called Joy and it became clear that we've had a major miscommunication.  We had had to re-schedule several times: Joy because of a marine camp for 40 schoolkids that would be held in the island, and they'd needed to do preparations for; me, because I needed to travel to Dumaguete on a specific date.  We finally had agreed on a date. Or so I thought, because she booked me a day later!  I asked her if I could go anyway, but she told me that only the warden was there, and no staff, and thus nothing to eat!

So there I was at the neglected, windswept pier with poor cell signal and Joy already running low on phone battery while we figured out what do next.  Joy suggested Punta Bulata, a posh white-sand resort, but it was too expensive.

Sunday family treat across the church
  Our conversation was cut short though when Joy's battery gave out, so I had to make my own plans.  Duane, my driver, took me back to Elsie's sari-sari store, suggesting that I find accomodation there.  At the store I mulled over my choices: a homestay and videoke all night at Bulata, or back to Sipalay, or Kabankalan City two hours away where I can find an internet cafe and at least use my downtime to finally write my blog.  I chose Kabankalan City.  I knew nothing about the place except that Faith from Driftwood Restaurant studied there. Plus, the place didn't even merit a blurb on my guidebook.

When I got to Kabankalan, I instantly regretted my choice. I imagined border-town seediness, just being on the outskirts alone.

Lifesaver
The only two hotels that were first mentioned were too expensive,  but for budget digs, I could go to RTM Traveller's Inn.  I went and the place was really basic and the bathroom badly stained, and I knew that, given the location, I was in for an uncomfortable night. I checked in, but kept asking the caretaker George, "Is it really safe?", then I left my bags to find an internet cafe.  There I googled Kabankalan.  Surprisingly, the city had its own nicely-done website where I found a list of the city's attractions and, most importantly,  a list of pension houses' numbers, which I began to call on my cell, one-by-one.  Top of the list was Justin's.  When I called they said it was near the park, church and the cost mid-range.  Perfect! I went over and was finally sold.  Apart from the clean room and bathroom, there was an internet place in the very same building.  I took my bags from RTM, felt bad for George (because he seemed hurt that I doubted him, and really I shouldn't have because he had really honest eyes), but he gave me back my money anyway.  The next day was Sunday so I went to church and saw the city center and changed my mind about Kabankalan -- a really nice place for a transient like me.

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The mine next to the pier for Danj…
The mine next to the pier for Dan…
Kabankalan church
Kabankalan church
Sunday family treat across the chu…
Sunday family treat across the ch…
Lifesaver
Lifesaver
World War II Veterans Memorial ne…
World War II Veteran's Memorial n…
Grassy field which probably holds …
Grassy field which probably holds…
Ati-atihan parade on the road to K…
Ati-atihan parade on the road to …
Negros
photo by: vidalibre