Ho Chi Minh City

Ho Chi Minh City Travel Blog

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Once we got to Ho Chi Minh, the weather finally started improving.  This, combined with the fact that I was sick to death of wearing trainers that squelched, lured me into the fatal mistake of wearing my brand new sandals from Phnom Penh. Tip one, my fellow travellers - don't wear new sandals to explore a city.  By the end of the day the blisters had torn open and, well, we can skip the details but I hobbled for days.

Despite this, and the long delay in me writing this blog, Ho Chi Minh City was one of my favorite places this trip.  Katie, Andy and Ollie were keen to get straight to the War Remnants museum and Iain and I weren't in such a rush, so we set out on foot.
Opera House


One of the first things that we saw was the Fine Art Museum.  I was absolutely fascinated - Iain shot around and then went to sit in the sunshine.  The museum spans fm some quite early statues of a sort of proto-Buddha figure and some ancient GOds to a large range of pieces of Communist art.  These coem in a much wider variety of styles than I'm used to associatingwith communism, because the only communist art you see in the UK is the sort of Soviet modernism stuff.  There were some really cool laquer paintings and a quite moving oil painting of coloured flowers surrounding a black and white painting of a photo of a lost friend.

After a small bickering match when I couldn't find Iain, we went to get an Icecream in a lovely icecream place which I can't currently remember the name of.
Notre Dame de Saigon
  As soon as I can find out I will have to write you a review.  It was wonderful, the service was great, and the cafe was very [pretty. 

Walking on, we passed Notre Dame cathedral and found our way to the war remnants museum.  I would really recommend a trip here, but it is quite disturbing.  As well as the photos of the war, there are quite graphic photos of the children still being born with congenital deformities because of Agent Orange, a reconstruction of the horrific conditions in jails of the era, and a really moving tribute to the war photographers from both sides who tried to tell the world about the war, many of whom died.  the museum is interesting because it tells the Vietnamese side of the story (naturally), but manages to maintain rather more balance than I was expecting; it certainly isn't anti western in the way it could have been.
War Remnants Museum
  For example, there is quite a lot of information about American photographers' bravery and a display about hte Kent State Massacre in the USA.  The museum is still under refurbishment at the moment, but is well worth a trip adn not expensive.

After that, Iain wanted to see if there was anything on at the cinema.  By this time my feet were in shreds, and I may have been a little grumpy.  Luckily, Vietnamese mall food is much better than British mall food, so I was perked up considerably by the fact that although there was nothing on at the cinema, the prawns in the mall were really good.

I was far too stubborn to get a cabhome, which was really silly.  Iain and I made it back to the hotel room and talked about getting dinner. 
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Opera House
Opera House
Notre Dame de Saigon
Notre Dame de Saigon
War Remnants Museum
War Remnants Museum
War Remnants Museum
War Remnants Museum
Dragon Hedge
Dragon Hedge
Go2
Go2
Skyline
Skyline
Market
Market
Museum of Fine Art
Museum of Fine Art