600 meters south of the old fig tree...

San Jose Travel Blog

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mi cama
I arrived Sunday with what felt like an entire rabble of butterflies in my stomach. Luckily, my luggage was not lost and there was someone waiting for me at the airport, so my irrational fears were alleviated. The driver took me to the Mirandas' house, where I met María Joaquina, José, Juan, Maricruz and Tío (Uncle) Manuel. To my surprise, there getting her ear talked off by Tío Manuel was Shannon, my friend whom I was coming here to meet! We had no idea we would be seeing each other so soon, let alone living in the same homestay! Since we hadn't seen each other in over a year, we made a scene complete with girlish screaming in front of the entire family. But I think they weren't too creeped out.

María Joaquina is my lovely hostmom. I've spent the most time with her and her 20-year-old daughter Maricruz, who are both great.
my pictures on the wall in my room
Right now, María is cooking some kind of seafood dish that smells scrumptious. The food I've had so far has been delicious, even though I've mostly just had rice, beans and eggs. The lunch staple here is called a "casado," which consists of rice, beans, meat or eggs, and some type of vegetable. Yum. Wow, I'm really hungry for dinner.

The house is adorable. Shannon, Aaron (an American guy who is doing a volunteer program) and I have our own wing of the house, which we have to walk through a little courtyard to get to. I'm sitting in the courtyard now because it is a beautiful night and the moon is out. The addresses here are crazy; everything is in relation to something else. For example, our address is very literally "600 meters south of the old fig tree, San Pedro, Costa Rica" and whatever fig tree is being referenced is no longer in existence. Silly. But I have my own room (and wireless internet) and a shared bathroom with a shower that is sometimes hot, and most importantly, yummy food. Life is good (pura vida!).

Class is pretty interesting. There are some concepts about teaching english in an immersion setting that are very different from normal teaching strategies in my language classes in the states. This afternoon, we had our first observation session and got to see how it all works. They teach us that we are supposed to "elicit everything and give them nothing," meaning that we are supposed to talk very little, but use pictures, demonstrations and context to pull the word we are trying to teach out of them. In the class I observed, the teacher spoke very little; she said just enough to get the students (whose English level was very low) to say the word she was looking for. We are giving our first mini-lesson on Friday, so that should be interesting.

Okay, dinner's almost ready. Adiós amores!
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mi cama
mi cama
my pictures on the wall in my room
my pictures on the wall in my room
San Jose
photo by: Isoinspira