The Scooter

Dillingen an der Donau Travel Blog

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Bavarian countryside

Bianca lost use of her scooter for driving it without a license. Walter said the machine came from Korea but I couldn't even find so much as a brand name on it. She got it as a promotional gift for signing a two-year cellular phone contract and her visored black and red Cocoon helmet was probably worth more than the scooter itself. They called it a 'city roller', probably for its small 12-inch wheels, and I was grateful to have free use of it during my stay in Wertingen.

 

Nighttime  temperatures had cooled drastically and frost warnings were in effect. Day temps too had chilled with increasing north winds and passing high clouds. Bundled in a borrowed winter jacket, I rode to Dillingen - about 17 kilometers.

The scooter on the Donau bridge, Dillingen
On level ground, the scooter topped out  with the needle somewhere off the speedometer which only indicated up to sixty (36mph). She bogged down to thirty-five on even the shallowest of hills. I hugged the right-hand edge of the winding black-top road while passing cars gave wide and courteous clearance. Emerging from pine forest into late morning sunshine, I immediately felt its warmth but the wind was still cold on the hands, almost numbing.

 

Just outside Dillingen, I stopped at the bridge crossing the Donau River (the Danube through Germany).

As I idled off the road, loose gravel on the pavement slid the scooter's front wheel right out from under me. Down I went on my right side. I could never figure out how it was my left hand that got nicked.

One of the locals
My shoulders compressed forward bruising a rib or two, but nothing was broken on me or the roller.  After tweaking the handlebars straight and taking a few photos of the river, I continued into town and stopped at a familiar beer hall - Walter and I had stopped by one day while Bianca was working but it looked like she was off today. I took a small indoor table, ordered a beer, and went into the restroom to rinse the dried blood from my hand.

 

I recognized the elderly woman dealing cards at a corner table as the matriarch of the place. Upstairs rooms that were once a guesthouse were now occupied by a large family of more than twenty. The woman maintained a supply of fresh beer and primarily locals still frequented the place. I don't think she offered a menu but I supposed that cooking for twenty people often provided extra food for the hungry.

Playing cards
Most stopped in to drink, visit, chat, and exchange gossip.

 

The matriarch got up to punch buttons on an old floor-model Wurlitzer jukebox that still spun records. German waltz-type music played softly in the background while other locals casually drank and chatted at one of the round tables. The window sills were decorated with small flower pots and statues of cats though I never saw a live one. While the wood-burning stove sat idle, warm sunlight illuminated beams of gray cigarette smoke drifting across the room. I finished my beer and headed back to the river.

[These pictures are from several trips to Dillingen…]

cneoridium says:
Glad you survived the gravel! I remember having the same problems with a similar scooter in college, with the tiny wheels once you one looses traction there's nothing you can do!
Posted on: Nov 06, 2009
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Bavarian countryside
Bavarian countryside
The scooter on the Donau bridge, D…
The scooter on the Donau bridge, …
One of the locals
One of the locals
Playing cards
Playing cards
Blood on the Donau
Blood on the Donau
Street into Dillingen
Street into Dillingen
Beer hall in Dillingen
Beer hall in Dillingen
Circus sign
Circus sign
Church tower in Dillingen
Church tower in Dillingen
Fresh beer supply
Fresh beer supply
Card game
Card game
Bianca pours a fresh one
Bianca pours a fresh one
Playing the jukebox
Playing the jukebox
Some jukebox selections
Some jukebox selections
Dillingen an der Donau
photo by: rotorhead85