Ayacucho, a cute mountain town

Ayacucho Travel Blog

 › entry 3 of 30 › view all entries
Plaza de Armas

Note: all the photographs on this page were made by the travbuddy skydiver (http://www.travbuddy.com/skydiver) because my camera was stolen and some pictures were lost. Thanks Martin!

 

From Lima to Ayacucho

 

The trip from Lima to Ayacucho gave me the first views of the Peruvian landscapes. When you exit Lima, you will notice that it is a desert city. Almost the entire coast of Peru is desert coast , empty and cloudy. It takes about an hour to get away from Lima’s shantytowns, and it is a very depressing sight to see all these slums in a foggy, garbage-laden desertland. But after three hours the bus turns towards the Andes and with half an hour or so the fog disappears, the sun shines brightly and the Andes awaits at the horizon.

Plaza de Armas

 

During the trip, the desert changes gradually into the Andes. Dunes het higher and higher and stonier and thus change into dry, rocky mountains. Nothing grows here except cacti. There are fields full of cacti. At one point my breathing began to trouble me and I felt lightheaded. The fields were empty outside, save for some alpaca’s here and there. We must have been at high altitude. I checked it later on and we were at 4200 meters! Thats higher than the Inca Trail will take us, and a shock for the body coming from Lima!

 

I was happy to go down to Ayacucho, at “only” 2750 m. The last two hours of the trip was just going down. I brought some chips with me, but the bag was so bloated it almost exploded hahaha!

 

Ayacucho

 

The cute, sunny mountaintown of Ayacucho is a world away from Lima. Not many tourists go here and people are friendly and curious. It is not as crowded as Lima, although the central shopping street can get clogged. Because there are little tourists also means the center is not so big and there is a lack of good restaurants.

women in Ayacucho

 

There are 33 churches to be found in Ayacucho, one for every year of Christ’s life, or so I am told. Nowadays lots of health services are provided in these churches like eye tests, acupuncture, or you can weigh yourself. Another fun thing to do is to take a look at the markets. Walk past the arch with the clock on the shopping street and on your right there are markets to be found. There are separate halls for meat, and clothing, and a block further is a poorer market of blue stalls. Here you can, say, let someone repair your shoe, or you can take a look at outlandish products for sale like black maize and oddly shaped potatoes. At the other side of town there is a "prison market", a market that used to be a prison but nowadays the cells are little shops. The guards haven't left though.

 

This was the first city where I saw women in more traditional clothing. Women wear their thick black hair in two tails on their back and often tie the ends together. They wear dresses and a high hat (but men don’t wear hats like this). They often have a very colorful blanket on their back with which they transport their stuff or a little child.


Note: all the photographs on this page were made by the travbuddy skydiver (http://www.travbuddy.com/skydiver) because my camera was stolen and some pictures were lost. Thanks Martin!

Join TravBuddy to leave comments, meet new friends and share travel tips!
Plaza de Armas
Plaza de Armas
streets of Ayacucho
streets of Ayacucho
Plaza de Armas
Plaza de Armas
women in Ayacucho
women in Ayacucho
Plaza de Armas
Plaza de Armas
One of many churches
One of many churches
a market
a market
Peruvian taxi
Peruvian taxi
Plaza de Armas at night
Plaza de Armas at night
Plaza de Armas at night
Plaza de Armas at night
Ayacucho
photo by: voordax