Reflections of a Cornish nature

Cornwall Travel Blog

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Scenic cliff-edge in Tintagel - a stone's throw from King Arthur's castle
Leaving the county of Devon, and heading ever-westwards, entering the county of Cornwall was the final port of call on the multi-stopover journey, and brought back memories of holidays spent there in days gone by, as well as being the ideal opportunity to visit some previously-unfamiliar areas, which I often think validates the whole experience. One of the first stop-off points was the small coastal town of Tintagel, which is famous for the legend of King Arthur's castle, and a scenic vantage point to boot. A short walk leads down to more rugged terrain where the cliff edge seems to fall into the sea on a rocky decline, and the castle itself is a mere stone's throw from this scenic viewing spot.
Braving the cold February surf at Fistral beach in Newquay
Driving further along the coast brought us eventually to the bona fide UK surfing mecca of Newquay, and the main body of the town itself seemed to have a sufficient range of eateries, shops and after hours options for a town of such a relatively compact size. Newquay's main draw card though, and the one aspect which brings fun-loving visitors to the town in their masses, is the surf, and the prime location of Fistral Beach makes for a truly great visit, either as a surfer, or indeed as a spectator, which was precisely my role due to my unwillingness to brave the sea in mid-February. Moving on from Newquay, a brief stop-off at St. Ives revealed the quaint nature of another popular coastal UK town, and in guest house terms, we had reached journey's end in Falmouth, where the service was top-class, and the stay as comfortable and homely as could be anticipated, suggesting that this was the ideal overnight stay to round off the whole trip.
Welcome to Land's End, where your vehicle is guaranteed of heading not much further west
A pleasant meal at a local Thai restaurant in Falmouth made for a worthwhile evening activity, and the town itself was barely recognizeable since I had last visitied it, save for the Falmouth shopping institution, Trago Mills, which had since expanded its repertoire to 2 larger branches in more rural areas of the South West region. A fleeting visit paid to the likeable Cornish town of Truro on the way home ensured that we were able to sample the best-tasting pasty in the land, and with memories of the South West planted firmly inside of us, it felt palpably as though we had experienced the best of what the region had to offer, albeit at an off-peak time of year, when the true holiday spirit of the area had still yet to manifest itself.
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Scenic cliff-edge in Tintagel - a …
Scenic cliff-edge in Tintagel - a…
Braving the cold February surf at …
Braving the cold February surf at…
Welcome to Lands End, where your …
Welcome to Land's End, where your…
Quayside imagery at Falmouth, the …
Quayside imagery at Falmouth, the…
The cathedral in Truro, one of Eng…
The cathedral in Truro, one of En…
Cornwall
photo by: Charbelto