Holy canoli I'm tired.

Florence Travel Blog

 › entry 7 of 25 › view all entries
On the top of the Duomo.

We started early Friday and climbed Brunelleschi's Duomo. Wow. The view from up there is amazing. But it is weird to see the city without it's landmark. It was a long, winding climb up, but I didn't think it was all that bad. But then you have to go down all of those stairs..

After the Duomo we made it to the Uffizi Gallery. I had to check my backpack at the door and was kicking myself because I forgot to get my sketchbook. Our tour guide was great and most likely all of that ifo is going to slowly seep out of my brain. After we drooled over Botticelli and Michelangelo, we made our way to the Academia. Like I said, busy day. We went only for David, so it's a good thing we had reservations. I could stare at David all day. I just can't get over the perfection that these Renaissance artist and architects had.

Duomo.
It is simply amazing; with their technology and science.. I'm so awestruck and speechless. I know I've said it before, but this city is truly amazing. And I have 4 more weeks here!

I went out exploring by myself yesterday. I love having alone time, especially in foreign countries. I just wandered around for a few hours.  I got some amazing gelato at Perche no, which is the place my Thesis Prep teacher told me about. Then I found this teeny-tiny shop on this deserted street. The store was literally 3' x 10'. The owner was this couple: an Italian woman and an Indian man, and they only open their store two months a year. The rest of th etime is spent travelling India looking for the finest handmade shawls. They were so beautiful. She was fun to talk to. She sort of reminded me of my mom and made me love this store even more.

Man I love this city.

Join TravBuddy to leave comments, meet new friends and share travel tips!
Piazza della Repubblica.

After a week of perfect weather, the rain came today. But lazy, rainy Sundays are just as good in Italy as they are in the States. I didn't do much today; I mainly worked on homework. I did venture out and get some groceries with a couple other girls.

I guess this would be a good time to talk about what I'm actually studying here in Florence. My 5 weeks here consists of two parts. The first part is the Art, Architecture, and Interiors of Florence. The instructor for this class is Stewart Abbott, from the AIU(American Intercontinental University) London campus. The second part will be the Villas and Gardens of Tuscany taught by Axel Griesinger, also from the AIU London Campus. We have class 4 times a week, and that usually means walking around looking at certain places of interest or museums.

Our housing on Via Ricasoli.
Each day we go to about 3 or 4 different sites. Some days we go back to the classroom and have a lecture, but most days we take notes while walking around. Once the two and a half weeks are over, we are required to turn in a journal with entries on our thoughts and feelings of the buildings and works we have studied in the course. (That is what I have been working on today). We will also have an essay to turn in on the history of Florence and its architecture.

So that in a nutshell is what I'm doing here. As you can imagine there's plenty of other stuff to do when I'm not in class, such as finding my way around the city and trying not to spend too much money. So far my favorite gelato place is Perche No. My Thesis Prep teacher back home told me about it. I'm trying to mark on a map every restaurant, shop, and miscellaneous place I've been too. So far I've got a good number of x's all around the city.

One thing I did not expect to encounter in Italy was all the mosquitoes! I swear I have more bites on me than I have ever had in my life at one time. But the thing is I've only seen about three the whole time I've been here. Italian mosquitoes are the sneakiest things!

My italian has gotten waaay better. I'm pleased with myself. I try to speak it everywhere I go, but I just don't know enough to get through every conversation without some English. But most people bear with me. Luckily one of my classmates is Italian and she speaks it pretty well, so she's a good resource to have. Almost everyday I'm asking her "remind me again, how do you say this?"

I haven't experienced too much culture shock. It's just little things like having to pay for water at dinner or paying for your grocery sack at the store, those sorts of things are just different, but I'm getting used to them. In many cases the wine really is cheaper than water! If anyone has any other questions about Florence, I'd be more than happy to answer them. I miss everyone!

Ciao!
Steph

On the top of the Duomo.
On the top of the Duomo.
Duomo.
Duomo.
Piazza della Repubblica.
Piazza della Repubblica.
Our housing on Via Ricasoli.
Our housing on Via Ricasoli.
Florence
photo by: monky