Devil's Kettle Falls

Hovland Travel Blog

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Devil's Kettle

We slept in, had a morning campfire and had pancakes for breakfast.  We headed back north to Judge Magney State Park.  While mom got her hiking shoes on, I went off in search of the geocache.  It started out in the parking lot that was our trailhead.  The clues took me back near the campground where I found the final cache location cleverly hidden in the bench. 

 

We took the Superior Hiking Trail out to Devil’s Kettle waterfalls.  It was a little over a mile each way with a slight but steady uphill climb, plus a bunch of steps down, and then another climb back up to the falls overlook.  At the bottom of the big steps was the Upper Falls and you could take some extra steps right down to the water.  Devil’s Kettle was only a little farther and was worth the hike. 

 

Devil’s Kettle is so called because a large rock outcropping divides the Brule River into two streams that plunge over the edge.  One side falls down 50 feet to the river below and the other side falls into a deep pothole and disappears forever.  Or so that’s how the legend goes.  It does appear that way.  Studies have been done and no one can quite explain where the water goes.  Very cool.
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Devils Kettle
Devil's Kettle
Park sign
Park sign
geocache under the bench
geocache under the bench
crossing the Brule River
crossing the Brule River
Cascades in the distance
Cascades in the distance
Upper Falls
Upper Falls
view downstream from upper falls
view downstream from upper falls
mom by upper falls
mom by upper falls
where does that water go?
where does that water go?
close up of the disappearing stream
close up of the disappearing stream
upstream of Devils Kettle
upstream of Devil's Kettle
Hovland
photo by: alyssa_ob
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