Ludwigsburg Castle: a Barogue Party Place

Ludwigsburg Travel Blog

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The castle

I worked for the US Government and was placed in Germany for about 3 years. My time there allowed me to travel to various cities and see so many historical castles and gardens. The days of living there were void of digital cameras which made film the king. I have tons of photos I need to scan and upload to show the beauty of the place at the time I was there in the eighties. I did return a few years ago and was able to get a few good shots on my ‘state of the art’ digital camera that I have posted.

 

Each year they have a really cool festival where everyone dresses up in Barogue costumes. It is a big party. I hope I can find some of those photos.

 

I actually lived in a small town called Bittenfeld.

Chapel
It was just outside of the city. I loved walking up to the swimbaud, the outdoor public swimming pool, strolling along the vineyards, talking with the locals or being picked up in a Mercedes taxi and driving in to town. It was fun to write home to everyone and tell them I was in a Mercedes. Oh well.

 

Here’s a little bit of history I learned while living there. I hope you enjoy it.

 

When Duke Eberhard Ludwig laid the cornerstone for a small hunting lodge above the Tälesbach on 7 May 1704, he had no idea that he was creating the core of the largest Baroque castle in Germany and of a city which would at one time play an important role in the politics, art, business, trade and industry of the state.

In 1718, the duke made Ludwigsburg a city and, at the same time, a residence.

Queens bedroom
Under the rule of Duke Carl Eugen (1744 - 1793), Ludwigsburg experienced its heyday. Elegant court festivals were held in the castle and the espousal celebration of the duke was one of the most glorious festivals in the history of the courts of that time with a unique firework display.

At first Duke Eberhard Ludwig only thought of having the hunting lodge, which had burnt down, reconstructed when building the residence castle, but when he died thirty years later, above the Neckar valley one of the most impressive German Baroque castles had come into being with extensive gardens and a new capital and residence city. The "Swabian Versailles" consists of a magnificent castle with eighteen buildings arranged around three courtyards and four hundred and fifty two rooms.

Dr_Seuss says:
That's some hunting lodge :-O Wonder how much it is a night to stay in the Queens Bedroom :-)
Posted on: Jun 21, 2009
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The castle
The castle
Chapel
Chapel
Queens bedroom
Queens bedroom
Knights Chamber
Knights Chamber
Knights Hall
Knights Hall
First Hall
First Hall
Sevants quarters
Sevants quarters
Queens throne
Queens throne
Queens throne
Queens throne
Courtyard
Courtyard
Ceiling painting
Ceiling painting
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Ludwigsburg
photo by: missandrea81