Downtown LA

Los Angeles Travel Blog

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So the night before had taken its toll and we were late in getting up and out, good job a fairly leisurely day had been planned.

We hopped on the tour bus, this time heading the opposite direction to Downtown. First stop Olvera Street, there was some sort of Mexican festival going on in the square with singing, dancing, market and food stalls. We had planned to look round on the way back so we stayed on the bus to Little Tokyo.

I like to visit places which are a bit off the usual tourist stops and had taken a fancy to Little Tokyo, it's a great place to wonder around and do nothing.

Jame Irvine Garden
The bus dropped us outside the Japanese American National Museum we didn't go in to the museum but just inside the lobby is a nice little garden which leads to the Cafe. It was quiet when we were there, outside was nearly empty. The front of the Museum is in a fairly big pedestrian area and opposite is the Nishi Hongwanji Buddhist temple, which is an impressive building. Across the street is the Japanese Village Plaza, an area of shops and restaurants and most direct route to the Japanese Cultural Centre where you will find the amazing James Irvine Garden. This is a hidden gem, funded by James Irvine, hence the name, it was designed Takeo Uesugi and is a world away from anywhere else in LA, defiantly worth hunting out for a picnic lunch.

Afterwards we hopped back on the bus to complete the tour, this route is not as good as the Hollywood/Beverly Hills route as there is not as much to see.

Catherine having a spot of lunch
After a long trip down Broadway with very little of interest to see you'll pass the convention centre and through the financial district, all a bit boring. The next point of real interest is the Walt Disney Concert Hall, a building which you can not miss with its shiny tin foil exterior.

The tour finishes after passing City Hall and through China town, if you've not got a lot of time in LA it's not really worth the trip, other than Little Tokyo.

Back at Olvera street we wandered down to look at the 'old' buildings built in late 1700, early 1800. For a country so proud of its history it amuses me that there is very little of it still standing. Growing up in a town which was built by the Normans in 1071 and has a castle still standing, I struggled with how tacky this place has been made in order to try and preserve it.

Quite time by a little stream
The Alila Adobe, built in 1818 and the oldest building in LA, has be kitted out with old furniture and people dressed in clothing from the time. This I have no problem with, but walls have been added to sheppard you through the building which were clearly made of plastic and the staff were too busy texting on authentic mobiles to actually tell you about the place. Outside the whole of the street is lined with stalls selling the usual tourist tat, saying that the festival which was going on at the top end was very enjoyable. It could of just been the hangover which made me a cynical miserable bugger, but not the most interesting or exciting of places to visit.

The rest of the afternoon was spent by the pool and then dinner across the street at Bossa Nova.

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Jame Irvine Garden
Jame Irvine Garden
Catherine having a spot of lunch
Catherine having a spot of lunch
Quite time by a little stream
Quite time by a little stream
Shiny Walt Disney Hall
Shiny Walt Disney Hall
Chinatown
Chinatown
Olvera Street
Olvera Street
Avila Adobe
Avila Adobe
Los Angeles Restaurants, Cafes & Food review
Good, well priced food
This place was across the road from our Motel so due to convenience it was the place of choice. There is a wide choice of Brazilian food including … read entire review