Day 11 - Day Trip to Dalyan

Dalyan Travel Blog

 › entry 11 of 42 › view all entries
Apply evenly ...

Since the agencies weren’t able to get us on a day trip to Dalyan, we decided to do it ourselves.  We got ourselves up at a reasonable hour and headed out on foot to the Otogar to get a dolmus to Ortaca, where we’d transfer to Dalyan.  We arrived just before the bus was about to leave and as the driver fired up the engine, Michelle reminded me to get the money ready to pay out fare (on the longer bus rides in this country, they collect the fare for the journey once its underway).  A quick check of each of my pockets and my day pack failed to turn up my wallet.  Cr*p!!  We jumped off the bus before it got underway, me cursing and Michelle urging me to calm down and stop cursing.

.. avoid contact to eyes ..
  Sure enough, I’d left my wallet behind.  Muppet!  So, we had no choice but to walk the hour back to our room, collect my wallet and then walk a half hour back again.  All our good intentions of getting away to an early start had been wasted.  We eventually managed to get on the bus to Ortaca and then found the connecting dolmus to Dalyan.  Once in Dalyan, we found exactly what we expected; Loads and loads of riverboats waiting to take people on day trips up and down the river.  We’d arrived too late to miss the few organised day trips that had departed but we soon realised that all the skippers were happy to take us wherever we wanted, it was just a matter of bartering a fee for their services. 

Michelle and I decided to get a feel for the city and its attractions first though, so we walked up and down the bank of the river, paying enough attention to the “You want boat trip?” enquiries to guestimate what might be a reasonable fare and then retired to a riverside restaurant to consider our options.

yes, its feels as gross as it looks.
  Unfortunately, lunch was nothing special.  The influx of English tourists to this town seems to have ruined it, or at least it ruined the menu at the place we chose to eat.  There was very little that was Turkish about it.  I chose the only kebab they had on the menu and Michelle chose a chicken breast.  Despite the limited menu the food was OK. 

It was past 1pm before we’d finished our lunch so it was obviously far too late to take the complete river boat tour of all the sites (which just so happen to all sit on the opposite side of the river, meaning you can’t see or visit anything without taking a river boat).  We decided that all we really wanted to do was visit the mud baths.

Mish poses with her new mate Ali Baba, skipper and turtle kicker.
So after negotiating our fare down from 50YTL to 30YTL the two of us jumped aboard a boat skippered by “Ali Baba” and he drove us about 5 minutes up and across the river to the jetty leading to the mud baths.

Whilst we’d managed to barter almost 50% off the original price of the boat ride, I think we were still ripped off.  30YTL for a return boat ride seemed a bit rich when compared to the 4YTL each we were charged for entry to the attraction itself. 

The mud bath wasn’t big but the facilities associated with it were.  It obviously turns over a significant number of visitors during summer, as there are a huge number of tables and chairs, a café and a lot of showers and changing facilities.

Random turtle subject to harassment from Ali Baba
  All of it seemed a bit much to us though, as we were the only people there when we arrived and we were only joined by two others in the time we were there. We changed into our bathers and made our way to the mud bath.  The smell of sulphur was pretty strong in the air but once we climbed into the mud, it wasn’t the smell but the texture of the mud that grabbed your attention.  Whilst wading and sliding about in the mud we met Kim and Brooke, a couple of Australian lasses we learnt were to be on the blue cruise with us starting tomorrow.  15 minutes of sliding about in the mud was enough.  Afterwards we moved to the showering area, which was quite obviously designed for large numbers of visitors.  It was something akin to a carwash, a long, wide drive with loads of high pressure jets blasting water downwards.  They needed to be high pressure jets though as the mud required a fair bit of effort to ply off.
Sunset view from our balcony in Fethiye
  Once we were clean we were then allowed to swim in the thermal bath.  It was warm and just what we needed after the cold showers we were forced to endure when cleaning off.  However, the water in this spring was also quite sulphurous so after emerging from the warm waters we were again forced to hose ourselves down with cold water before drying and changing for the boat ride back across the river.  Ali Baba took us back across the river and tried to sit us down for Apple Tea before letting us leave.  However, we were quite tired and knew we had more than two hours of travelling ahead of us before we’d be back in the comfort of our own room, so we tried to excuse ourselves as politely as we could and worked our way towards the Otogar in the middle of town. 

We ate dinner at the Hotel, a delicious chicken casserole, stuffed pepper, rice and salad and after a couple of games of backgammon (which I lost to Michelle) we retired early to pack and prepare to depart on our sailing trip tomorrow.
Join TravBuddy to leave comments, meet new friends and share travel tips!
Apply evenly ...
Apply evenly ...
.. avoid contact to eyes ..
.. avoid contact to eyes ..
yes, its feels as gross as it look…
yes, its feels as gross as it loo…
Mish poses with her new mate Ali B…
Mish poses with her new mate Ali …
Random turtle subject to harassmen…
Random turtle subject to harassme…
Sunset view from our balcony in Fe…
Sunset view from our balcony in F…
Dalyan
photo by: ZoeCaitlin