Africancrab in Tanzania; touring Dar-es-Salaam, and enjoying the culture and history of the people

Dar es Salaam Travel Blog

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Sights and scenes of Dar-es-salaam

The word is 'Habari dada'! Can you say that? It means 'how are you sister. How about 'Vipi mambo?' well, that is what's up, or what is going on? how about 'Jambo?' this is the most widely known word to all foreigners who visit or know about Tanzania. It is a greeting , Jambo means hello. The United Republic of Tanzania (jamhuri ya Muungano wa Tanzania) is the largest of the 5 countries that make up East Africa. Composed of 26 regions including the independent region of Zanzibar, the country is based on a socialist system of rule. Many may still refer to Dar-es Salaam as the capital, but the official capital is now Dodoma. From Independence up until 1996, Dar-es-salaam was the capital.

Dar-es-Salaam (Dar) the former capital of Tanzania is also a seaport town that is quite populated, but is not the one place you hear someone planning a holiday too.

Sights and scenes of Dar-es-salaam
  The name of the city directly translates to 'house of peace' in Arabic. The more popular destinations like Kilimanjaro, Zanzibar, Pemba etc take attention away from it. But I would like to tell you that there is quite a bit to see and learn while in this bustling capital city. It has some of the world's large chain hotels like Hilton, intercontinental, Sheraton now Starwood. From Dar, there are various safari options including going to Zanzibar, Pemba, the national parks like Selous game reserve and Mahale mountain park. Within the city itself, something exciting is market time; Kariakoo market is the town's largest market and can be pretty crowded, it is interesting bargaining for literally everything and anything you wish to buy. Now if you are a foreigner, the Swahili will take advantage of you by offering an extremely high price with the mind that you are going to bargain for a lower price. So learn the art of bargaining because marked prices are not always final like in western supermarkets.
Sights and scenes of Dar-es-salaam
Another attraction in the city is the clock tower., the National Museum and the botanical gardens. Mt most exciting memory is the experience with the local transportation: they have what they call dala-dalas and matatu.

The culture of the Tanzanian people is a rich one, and their history is one of the oldest in human habitation. The Tanzanians are a Bantu speaking people, their ancestors brought the language with them from west Africa from whence they migrated thousands of years ago. The economy is mostly agricultural with a few areas where herding is done. Much of the country is christian in religion and the national language is Swahili. 

The night life is exciting and fun; there are so many nightclubs and I'm sure they change as frequent as they did when I was last there.

Sights and scenes of Dar-es-salaam
The locals are so intuned with what is happening and change their styles based on what is happening. I went to a night club called Bilicanas (not sure if it is still open). a night club called Chui Bay is a great one for the dance lover.

PS: Do not leave for tomorrow what you can accomplish today! 

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” Mark Twain

 

 

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Sights and scenes of Dar-es-salaam
Sights and scenes of Dar-es-salaam
Sights and scenes of Dar-es-salaam
Sights and scenes of Dar-es-salaam
Sights and scenes of Dar-es-salaam
Sights and scenes of Dar-es-salaam
Sights and scenes of Dar-es-salaam
Sights and scenes of Dar-es-salaam
Sights and scenes of Dar-es-salaam
Sights and scenes of Dar-es-salaam