Music and Jollibee (again)

San Mariano Travel Blog

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Workshop 3D modelling

Time is going fast. I am already two weeks in the Philippines. It is slowly getting warmer.

 

The Filipino’s remain an elusive people to me.Take the language for example! Tagalog is the national language, but it is heavily mixed with English. The daily use of Tagalog is therefore called Taglish (also, for instance, when you go to an ATM, you can choose for your language between English and Taglish). In this region, it is even more complicated, because people also speak the local language Ilocano. I don’t understand any words, but 1 out of 10 words is English. And not just modern words, but fragments of sentences. Like this (I hope I do not offend anyone):

“Maybe we can blablalabla at that time?”

“Blabla, at 4 o’ clock blalalalablalbala, but maybe blalalalablalbala refridgerator.

Modern Philippine churches still have the same shape as the old spanish ones.
My goodness!”

 

I was walking on the campus, and suddenly something completely unexpected happened! I met two dutchmen! It was an elderly couple, Frisians, and they told me the weirdest story. It was a rambling story, but here is the summary:

 

The couple was guests at the house of the governor of Isabela province, Madam Grace Padaca. Now you should know that Madam Padaca is quite a celebrity. She has won the Ramon Magsaysay Award for good leadership, the Asian equivalent of the Nobelprize. A few years ago the governor was a guest in the Netherlands and she met our Queen. And because the local Philippine bisshop had contact with a Frisian bisshop, the governor somehow lodged at the house of these Frisians.

A typical jeepney

As a child, the governor suffered from polio, which brought here a troubled walk in later life, but the dutch couple made her new shoes, for which she was very grateful. And so, Madam Padaca invited the couple to stay with her in the Philippines.

Now, the elderly couple seemed to be completely unaware of Ma’am Padaca’s political weight and status and they were quite obnoxious. In front of important officials, they started complaining in dutch about the bathrooms and the Philippine food (and they were staying at the governor’s house for heavens sake!). They just didn’t get it. I was ashamed to be a dutchman right then.

 

Thursday there was a concert in Cabagan, the first in 25 years! There were five bands, but they were all with the same artists! They just switched instruments! We all had to rise for the national anthem.

*kiss* Thanks Jollibee for the lovely pancakes.
It was a great show, and I’m sure in 25 years people will still talk about it, hehehe.

A little boy came to sit next to me, and he was heavily fascinated by my causasian appearance. He showed me all the tricks with his lighter, but kept burning his fingers, so stopped very soon. When he heard I worked with crocodiles, he asked me if it included giant crocodiles. I said yes, and his eyes became very big, hehehe. The rest of the evening he just had to remain in the vicinity of this extraordinary western crocodile wrester!

 

Sunday was a day out. We went to Tuguegarao, not for Jollibee’s but for Chow King! This is another McDonald’s like fastfood chain, but distinctively Asian. And in Chow King they have fingerlicking halo halo: milk, icecream and fruit! Very nice.

And here we clone our crashlanded aliens. (crocodile rearing station)
The ice was ubi-flavored, and if I understood correctly this is from the root of the cassave. It is a completely unknown taste to me, but it was great! Ok, I have to admit, later on we visited Jollibee’s, and good thing too! We met the one and only Jollibee in person! (see the pics!)

 

We also went to the village of San Mariano, where is located one of our rearing stations. Here we keep juvenile crocodiles, till they are big enough to reintroduce into the wild. That way the population will grow the fastest. (Our project, CVPED, is in the Lonely Planet guides these days! People can visit the rearing station and arrange a tour with members of our team to search for the crocodile in the Sierra Madre national park!) The rearing station will get a makeover as soon as possible.

Jeroenadmiraal says:
Thank you :)
Posted on: Aug 20, 2010
TravellinChic says:
I like your openness to the Filipino culture :) That's the right attitude of a traveler. Not forcing one's own way of life to a country he is visiting and yet with all the bad sides and good sides, being a good observer and enjoying the nice little charms unique in the place visited :) Obviously, you're a happy man..opposed to grumpy bitter people who only find faults in things :P Good for you :)
Posted on: Aug 11, 2010
Jeroenadmiraal says:
There is an existing but steeply declining population in the wild in this area. It is this population we try to keep viable. The crocodiles in the rearing station are captured in the wild as hatchlings and when they are bigger, released. Hence, reintroduction.
Posted on: Feb 15, 2009
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Workshop 3D modelling
Workshop 3D modelling
Modern Philippine churches still h…
Modern Philippine churches still …
A typical jeepney
A typical jeepney
*kiss* Thanks Jollibee for the lov…
*kiss* Thanks Jollibee for the lo…
And here we clone our crashlanded …
And here we clone our crashlanded…
Workshop 3D modelling
Workshop 3D modelling
Jollibee is getting harassed by ch…
Jollibee is getting harassed by c…
Willem chased away the children to…
Willem chased away the children t…
Yay Jollibee!
Yay Jollibee!
Sam and Tess and Jolli
Sam and Tess and Jolli
A juveline Philippine crocodile
A juveline Philippine crocodile
downtown San Mariano
downtown San Mariano
San Mariano
photo by: Jeroenadmiraal