Discovering the history and a new treasure

Raglan Travel Blog

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Off to Raglan
The interesting and exciting thing about history is that there are countless aspects to look at it.
On the way to Raglan

There are heaps of not too important events, quite a lot of very special happenings and a few absolutely unique events.

The first group might be interesting as well but you often don't even notice these dates, places and people.

The second group are all the exciting and significant happenings, personalities and treaties that are written in thick history books and taught at school.

But the last group's events and dates are those, which became so far-reaching that people even celebrate them as a public holiday in present time.

Waitangi Day belongs to this third group and is one of New Zealand's most important and extremely historical public holidays.

The 6th February 1840 is known as the day when more than 40 Maori Chiefs came together and signed the 'Treaty of Waitangi', which was a document written by British men. The Maoris lost their sovereignty to Great Britain but they should be treated equal with signing the treaty since this date.

However, the treaty wasn't that what it seemed to be and many British promises were worthless and the Maori tribes felt cheated.

The beach

Waitangi Day is a public holiday in present time to remind us of the immense important beginning of the state New Zealand under the British crown. But maybe we should also think of a fairer and really equal way to connect our modern world with newly discovered or occupied countries.

I think one aspect history offers us is to learn how to avoid old mistakes. Of course, there will be more new failures but at least we should minimize the quote in not repeating wrong decisions from the past.

 


So, what did I do today?


I headed to Raglan beach with some very special kiwi friends (or maybe rather with my kiwi family). The weather has been totally summery the last days so that our public holiday plan was easily made.

Lucky us, almost anybody seemed to be out on the beach that early. Okay, it was 10am but maybe still too early for many public holiday enjoyers. 


After some relaxing moments under a big tree and in the salty seawater we started our next great mission: geocaching on the sunny beach, yeah!

After following the GPS to the first waypoint we had to find the label with the coordinates, which would guide us to the actual cache.

View from the other shore
We kept looking and looking and looking and hoping our feet wouldn’t burn on the black hot sand and looking and starting to get miserable and looking and suddenly we found the label. Nice work!

Now we were heading to the original hiding place and hoping no muggle (a not geocache enthusiast) would wonder too much about our sneaking through the bushes.

Finally a friend and I found the cache at the same time - got it!


Wow, now we had to run in the shade, where we would have our lunch because we began to feel like a snowman in a desert.

All in all it was a pretty amusing and sun and seawater dominated ‘Waitangi’ morning.
geokid says:
What was in the bag?
Posted on: Feb 06, 2009
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Off to Raglan
Off to Raglan
On the way to Raglan
On the way to Raglan
The beach
The beach
View from the other shore
View from the other shore
A seagull
A seagull
Hey!
Hey!
Behind the hill ...
Behind the hill ...
Found it!
Found it!
Whats in there?
What's in there?
More beach
More beach
Raglan
photo by: ashleynpearson