Touring Trichy

Tiruchirappalli Travel Blog

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Trichy - typical street scene!!

They are "Four Lane-ing" the Tanjore to Trichy road. As a result, it took an uncomfortable 90 minutes for the 50 km.

Tiruchirappalli (Trichy) is a large clean busy interesting town. On the outskirts are many colleges/ universities some in grand buildings to provide for the growing youth population whose parents have money. There are 2 main sights, the Rock Fort and the Sri Rangam Temple. The Fort is perched on a high outcrop, and reached by steps cut in the rock up through a tunnel - some 200+ of them. As it's also a Ganesh Temple, you go barefoot. There are great views from the top and yellow clad Ganesh devotees admired the scene too. We then wandered through some pretty clean backstreets round the base of the Fort.

The Sri Rangam Temple, dedicated to Vishnu, is said to be the largest in India.

Want a saucepan?
Over 260 acres of it. Red clad Vishnu pilgrims walked determinedly to the huge entrance tower - gopura- 60 m high and garishly painted. Our guide told us they would abstain from meat and sex for 3 weeks until the pilgrimage was completed! We wandered through several more gateways, through huge pillared halls, past altars/ chapels, where the brahmin priests helped devotees with their puja. There's fine carving, vast space, big tanks for bathing, a "Door of Immortality" opened only once a year. The inner sanctum is barred to non Hindus, so we could only glimpse the revered representation of Vishnu. Our guide finally led us onto the Temple roof. We could see all the gopuras, one completely white for purity, and the arched golden roof of the main sanctuary. Quite a sight.

And quite a contrast to the elegant early 19th Century St John's Anglican Church near our hotel, with its pillared portico, rattan chairs and memorials to the Brits.

Temple roofs
Outside was a fairly well tended graveyard. And also a contrast to the RC Lourdes Church in the centre - yes, a copy of the Basilica at Lourdes! Young men and women knelt on the stone floor of the furniture-less nave. And yes, shoes off to enter here too.

Outside Trichy, we visited the small village of Kanadukathan, home of the Chettinad clan. They intermarried, made considerable fortunes in trade in Raj times, and built huge mansions here early last century. Many are dilapidated, but some restored. One looked like a 1930s Odeon. Another, a "homestay", we went in to get a drink. None provided - but we were shown round by the owner: Italian marble, Burmese teak, Birmingham ironwork. 126 rooms altogether. He told us at length about his 28 day tour of Europe and showed the monograph he'd written about it.

We'd also stopped in Puddukotai, formerly the only princely state in Tamil Nadu. The Rajah had a new palace built for himself in the early 1920s, very attractive with its verandahs and courtyard. It's now the Collector's Office (government official - what a lovely raj era title) But the police guard let us in, showed us round and refused a tip.

Next stop, the great temple town of Madurai.

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Trichy - typical street scene!!
Trichy - typical street scene!!
Want a saucepan?
Want a saucepan?
Temple roofs
Temple roofs
Temple cart and gopuram
Temple cart and gopuram
Chettinad odeon
Chettinad odeon
Tiruchirappalli
photo by: mikehil