travertine waterfall

Davis Travel Blog

 › entry 7 of 20 › view all entries
Turner Falls

Our next stop was a travertine waterfall called Turner Falls, also the largest waterfall in Oklahoma.  Once again we didn't do our research completely.  We were excited to see this waterfall, but didn't realize it was more like a water park where you pay to go swimming or hiking and generally spend the day there.  It was too expensive (as in not free) for our desired 10 minute stop so we just viewed it from the pay station.  It looked like a really cool place to spend a day, just not today since it was too cool and we didn't have time.  Honey Creek plunges 77 feet into a teal blue pool.  You can swim in this pool or in a nearby one that also has a slide.   There is also hiking, caves, cabins, and a picnic area.

slide area
  The waterfall and pool were gorgeous and we were sad we couldn't get closer to see it better.   

Somewhere south of Turner Falls was a geological pullout on the interstate.  We were driving through the Arbuckle Mountains and this sign pointed out the geology and rock layers of the Arbuckle anticline (take a phone book and push the spine and loose edge together so the pages buckle upwards - that is an anticline).   Jordan decided he needed to climb the outcrop.  It did look like good climbing, but I think I may have been a little too hungover to do any climbing.  Instead I looked at the conglomerate from the ground.  You could see the tilted rock layers better across the road. 

Join TravBuddy to leave comments, meet new friends and share travel tips!
Turner Falls
Turner Falls
slide area
slide area
Turner Falls from view point
Turner Falls from view point
Swimming pool and Honey Creek
Swimming "pool" and Honey Creek
my rock hammer
my rock hammer
Geology stop on the interstate
Geology stop on the interstate
Jordan climbing the road cut
Jordan climbing the road cut
conglomerate
conglomerate
tilted rocks of the anticline
tilted rocks of the anticline
Davis
photo by: alyssa_ob