Ganh Dau

Ganh Dau Travel Blog

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Ganh Dau boats
 

Unable to find the bridge at Rach Tram, I reconnected with the main road back at the watch tower and headed south - toward Duong Dong. It was six or eight miles to the turn-off to Ganh Dau which was 18 kilometers to the west. The road was hilly, curvy, and nicely shaded through unspoiled National Forest, but a bit busier with local people and tourists alike driving both motorbikes and hired minivan taxis. After forty minutes, I finally topped a hill and rounded a curve to a view that suddenly opened wide. It took a few seconds to register that the field of flat, open, gray-blue expanse before me was the Gulf of Thailand and I had emerged from green forest into Ganh Dau, the fishing village at the extreme northwest corner of Phu Quoc.

View from restaurant

 

Women sold colorful seashells of all forms, shapes and sizes at two tables near the end of the road where a seafood restaurant sat at the water's edge. Another outside rack held squid drying in the sun. I took an airy table overlooking the small bay and ordered a Tiger. The ice cold beer was served along with a damp and chilled white wash cloth sealed in plastic which was equally refreshing after wiping red road dust from my face, neck, and head then arms and hands.

 

Dozens of fishing boats anchored on the small bay. That western side of the island was protected from the winds by the island itself. Most activity on the calm waters were long-tail taxi boats hauling people to and from the anchored fleet.

Secluded beach
Several floating platforms contained small houses; mobile homes for fishermen and their families. Turtle Island is a popular dive spot but without a map I could not identify it since numerous small islands scattered just offshore. The nearest island belonging to Cambodia lies just 4 kilometers to the northwest.

 

After relaxing there for a good while I found a narrow road that followed the shoreline toward Duong Dong. I passed miles of secluded tree-lined beach and numerous white-sand coves. Another watch tower stood along one stretch where only cattle strolled the shaded shore. Near the fishing village of Cua Can, I lost the trails south by a detour slightly inland. Construction was under way on a wide new road that will eventually open the northern west coast to future development. That will take years, and meanwhile, I will come back to Phu Quoc to explore it further and absorb what the fascinating island has to offer. And when I do, will be sure to carry a map.

tvillingmarit says:
Keep on feeding me with blogs from Vietnam, thanks Dan. Have a great weekend
Posted on: Jan 16, 2009
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Ganh Dau boats
Ganh Dau boats
View from restaurant
View from restaurant
Secluded beach
Secluded beach
Anchored boats and houses
Anchored boats and houses
Ganh Dau fishing boat
Ganh Dau fishing boat
Cattle and watch tower
Cattle and watch tower
Cattle at the beach
Cattle at the beach
Deserted beach
Deserted beach
Squid drying and the fleet that br…
Squid drying and the fleet that b…
Ganh Dau fishing fleet
Ganh Dau fishing fleet
Long-tail taxi boat
Long-tail taxi boat
Seashells
Seashells
Squid
Squid
Taxi boat
Taxi boat
Near Cua Can
Near Cua Can
The road south
The road south
Ganh Dau
photo by: rotorhead85