Moscovite Wanderings

Moscow Travel Blog

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Peter the Great Statue on the Moscow River

First thing this morning had to pack up the bags and put them into a storage closet in the little complex where we were staying.  But we still had all day to explore Moscow before leaving on an overnight train to St. Petersburg later in the evening.

Jon and I decided to head out exploring for the day.  Our first stop was to be at the Contemporary Russian History Museum just down the street on Tverskaya from our lodging.  We spent a good portion of the morning exploring this excellent museum before heading off.  (See the accompanying review for additional details on the museum itself).

From here we went to the Metro to head south of Red Square and across the Moskva River.

Lots of Lenins
  This area was the artsy district of Moscow.  The old Tretyakov Gallery was in this area (although we skipped this) and we found a small restaurant to have lunch here.  Then we walked east to the river to see the large statue of Peter the Great standing in the middle of the river, gazing over the Russian empire.  An impressive if somewhat tacky sight if one must be honest.

Along the river were the two main focal points that we were trying to reach.  The first was a small park along the river.  In the days after the fall of the Soviet Union this area had become an unofficial depository of old remnants of Soviet memorials.  At one point they were to be destroyed but eventually the Moscow government decided to keep them in this park area.

Waiting in the station for our train to St. Petersburg
  Today scattered throughout the park are statues of Lenin, Stalin, Dzezhinsky, and others.  As the park grew in stature other sculptures were added and today one can find a wide variety of pieces dotting the landscape of the park.

Adjacent to this park was the Tretyakov Gallery annex on Krymsky Val.  The Tretyakov Gallery is the foremost collection of Russian art in the world.  While the Tretyakov Gallery buildings mentioned earlier focused on works from previous eras, the annex housed a collection of contemporary Russian artwork from the 20th century.  Similar to the 798 Arts District in Beijing that I visited three weeks ago, this was an intriguing insight into the local arts scene of a country that is quite different from my own.

We spent a long time here such that we were rushing to make it back to the complex to meet the rest of the group on time to get our bags and head for the train. But we did make it back in time and it was off for one last ride in the Moscow Metro.  This one was absolutely silly.  With all our gear and in the middle of afternoon rush hour we plied our way through the crowd to reach the Leningradsky train station.  We had a bit of a wait so I found some semblance of a dinner at a shop while waiting to board the train.  Eventually the time to board came, and the final train journey of the trip was about to take place.

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Peter the Great Statue on the Mosc…
Peter the Great Statue on the Mos…
Lots of Lenins
Lots of Lenins
Waiting in the station for our tra…
Waiting in the station for our tr…
Peter the Great Statue on the Mosc…
Peter the Great Statue on the Mos…
Peter the Great Statue on the Mosc…
Peter the Great Statue on the Mos…
Albert Einstein Bust
Albert Einstein Bust
Statue Park in Moscow
Statue Park in Moscow
Statue Park in Moscow
Statue Park in Moscow
Statue Park in Moscow
Statue Park in Moscow
Street scenes in Moscow
Street scenes in Moscow
Christ the Saviour Cathedral - lar…
Christ the Saviour Cathedral - la…
Waiting in the station for our tra…
Waiting in the station for our tr…
Moscow Sights & Attractions review
A Russian view of the Revolution
The Contemporary Russian History Museum covers the period from the late 19th century (the end of the czarist period) through the Russian Revolution an… read entire review
Moscow
photo by: eefab