Volunteering Day 2

Moshi Travel Blog

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Mbokomu School - me painting
I woke up at 6am again. It was raining again but looked much brighter.

After another standard breakfast, we headed off to the school and continued where we left off from the day before. My group started desk making and finished off with the painting. It was hot work in the sun but it was incredible the amount of difference it was making to the appearance of the school.

Jane felt better today so joined us at the school to do some work.

Emanuel was there again telling us how rahisi sana it all was.

It is amazing that people don't understand why Westerners want to come to countries such as Tanzania in their spare time and volunteer. I am very conscious of the thoughts that short term volunteering can be patronising to the locals, but I think there is also a great lack of understanding of the difference that can be made in short term volunteering.
Mbokomu School - me with the students


After just two days of working at the school we had completely repainted the exterior of the school and build 8 desks for the children to use. This kind of giving, in my opinion, is much more beneficial than those people who throw sweets and pencils around to young kids they come across. This just reinforces the idea that Westerners are going to give presents to everyone, and those that come not offering gifts can be met with contempt.

It's a strange world we live in.

That evening, Jane wanted to visit the orphanage she was fundraising for on the Kilimanjaro climb. It was called the Amani Children's Home and was not far from Moshi. She had some gifts for the school and wanted to visit some of the children.

We got a taxi there and met one of the co-ordinators, Valerie, an American woman who had lived in Tanzania for many years.
Amani Children's Home
She was in a hurry but told us we were welcome to join the kids in their playing group, where they were having music lessons and playing football.

We spent around 30 minutes there with the children before departing again. It was a great environment and it was clear that the orphanage had lots of funding. It could easily have passed for a British primary school playground (in fact, it was quite superior to anything I ever had at school.) It was great to see that the street children had somewhere fantastic to go if they needed to though, and it shows just how much can be done with a little support.

Amani Children's Home Video
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Mbokomu School - me painting
Mbokomu School - me painting
Mbokomu School - me with the stude…
Mbokomu School - me with the stud…
Amani Childrens Home
Amani Children's Home
Amani Childrens Home
Amani Children's Home
Mbokomu School
Mbokomu School
Mbokomu School
Mbokomu School
Mbokomu School - our paint work
Mbokomu School - our paint work
Mbokomu School - Kate, one of the …
Mbokomu School - Kate, one of the…
Mbokomu School - one of the teache…
Mbokomu School - one of the teach…
Mbokomu School students
Mbokomu School students
Mbokomu School
Mbokomu School
Amani Childrens Home
Amani Children's Home
Amani Childrens Home
Amani Children's Home
Amani Childrens Home
Amani Children's Home
Amani Childrens Home
Amani Children's Home
Amani Childrens Home
Amani Children's Home
Moshi
photo by: joseph98