Iran

Iran Travel Blog

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IRAN

We are constantly being reminded about the great menace posed by ‘Iran’; I never previously contemplated a visit to Iran, it was a snap decision without any great thought.  My tendency towards spontaneity lead me to contact the Iranian Embassy in London and apply for a visa. Weeks of waiting led me to thinking that receiving a visa was far from likely to happen.  I was Concerned that my joy of travel mainly due to having had several recent visa stamps on my passport; namely United States of America (where I visited New York), or the fact that I had a Venezuelan visa would work against me and that the decision makers at the Embassy would have some sort of prejudice with Iran and Venezuela sharing the trench together.  So, it was to my surprise and delight that the Iranian visa was posted soon after!

Once viewing this fancy print of the visa on the passport it lead me to think; this is quality work with a sliver emblem and motif of the Iranian nation. Within days I told a few close friend that id be travelling to Iran on a photographic journey across the country.  I received mixed reactions, mainly warnings, one interesting comment was ‘crickey anything that starts with ‘IRA’ is an extreme NO! NO! good luck!’. I was still cautious about visiting Iran.  But I said to myself what the heck, ive got my visa, ive booked my flight, I am half way there, so I am just going to go!

 

AZIDI

Given the mixed opinions on my venture, I was happy to find that Iran was one of the most hospitable places I’ve ever visited. The warm welcome and generosity of Iran’s people had no limits and this good feeling transcends across faith, colour and creed.  Iran’s diverse landscape and history makes it a jewel for photographers.

All the scaremongering back home, on where I can take photos and where I cant, was all a myth.  The first day of photography in Tehran was mainly focused on major landmarks like the ‘Azidi’ (which was built to commemorate the 2500 years of the Persian Empire). Although it a commonly photographed location, I was adamant to have a slightly different take on this structure - to emphasise the complex design and construction, while at the same time capture its mammoth size.  Little did I know, Tehran was the largest city in the Middle East, and finding the Azidi monument would be a task in itself.  The fact that my Farsi was literally nothing beforehand made situations even more daunting.  I thought I’d give it a go and try my luck and ask a group of youngsters on the direction, only to find that they had pulled over a taxi and paid for my taxi fare to Azidi Square!

Despite the squeeze on its economy over the last few decades from the International community, Iran still shuns the outside world with advancement in many areas.. Moreover, Iranian people come across with an upbeat spirit bursting with energy.  But what strook me about the Iranan people is their sharpness and intellect.

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IRAN

 

We are constantly being reminded about the great menace posed by ‘Iran’; I never previously contemplated a visit to Iran, it was a snap decision without any great thought.  My tendency towards spontaneity lead me to contact the Iranian Embassy in London and apply for a visa. Weeks of waiting led me to thinking that receiving a visa was far from likely to happen.  I was Concerned that my joy of travel mainly due to having had several recent visa stamps on my passport; namely United States of America (where I visited New York), or the fact that I had a Venezuelan visa would work against me and that the decision makers at the Embassy would have some sort of prejudice with Iran and Venezuela sharing the trench together.  So, it was to my surprise and delight that the Iranian visa was posted soon after!

Once viewing this fancy print of the visa on the passport it lead me to think; this is quality work with a sliver emblem and motif of the Iranian nation. Within days I told a few close friend that id be travelling to Iran on a photographic journey across the country.  I received mixed reactions, mainly warnings, one interesting comment was ‘crickey anything that starts with ‘IRA’ is an extreme NO! NO! good luck!’. I was still cautious about visiting Iran.  But I said to myself what the heck, ive got my visa, ive booked my flight, I am half way there, so I am just going to go!

 

AZIDI

 

Given the mixed opinions on my venture, I was happy to find that Iran was one of the most hospitable places I’ve ever visited. The warm welcome and generosity of Iran’s people had no limits and this good feeling transcends across faith, colour and creed.  Iran’s diverse landscape and history makes it a jewel for photographers.

All the scaremongering back home, on where I can take photos and where I cant, was all a myth.  The first day of photography in Tehran was mainly focused on major landmarks like the ‘Azidi’ (which was built to commemorate the 2500 years of the Persian Empire). Although it a commonly photographed location, I was adamant to have a slightly different take on this structure - to emphasise the complex design and construction, while at the same time capture its mammoth size.  Little did I know, Tehran was the largest city in the Middle East, and finding the Azidi monument would be a task in itself.  The fact that my Farsi was literally nothing beforehand made situations even more daunting.  I thought I’d give it a go and try my luck and ask a group of youngsters on the direction, only to find that they had pulled over a taxi and paid for my taxi fare to Azidi Square!

Despite the squeeze on its economy over the last few decades from the International community, Iran still shuns the outside world with advancement in many areas.. Moreover, Iranian people come across with an upbeat spirit bursting with energy.  But what strook me about the Iranan people is their sharpness and intellect.

12,393 km (7,701 miles) traveled
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