Keep Out!

Little Summer Island Travel Blog

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Garden Peninsula

I realized how Snail Shell Harbor got the name while spiraling out of it with left rudder. I had to paddle three-quarters of full circle to find a southern course back out on the lake. Then I made one more brief stop. It was a short walk from a sandy beach through an old, old cemetery to Sherry's Port Bar. It would be my last trace of civilization until reaching Washington Island sometime in the next couple of days. Finally, after a beer and a cheeseburger, it was time to get back to my Great Lake adventure.

Scenery down the west side of Garden Peninsula was spectacular. I hugged the shoreline to glide beneath long stretches of limestone cliffs. Many had what looked like deep caves between tall columns and I wondered if that was where rock had been quarried for the old blast furnaces at Fayette.

Limestone cliffs
White-tail deer lapped water from the rocky shore but disappeared into spruce and cedar woods before I was ever able to get close enough for pictures.

When Little Summer Island swung into view I angled toward it, planning to camp there and do some exploring. To do so, I needed to remain undetected from Fairport, a remote fishing village two miles to the east. The island's caretaker lived there - Little Summer was owned by a European. I had already stowed the mast and pirate flag sail and the low profile must have worked for no boats headed my way.

I found a small dock on the NW corner of the island and tied up there. 'Keep Out', 'Private Property', and 'No Trespassing' signs warned me from stepping any further. Rather than risk being caught, shot, or forever banned from setting foot on Little Summer in the future, I decided to  continue on to nearby Big Summer Island.

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Garden Peninsula
Garden Peninsula
Limestone cliffs
Limestone cliffs
Little Summer Island
photo by: rotorhead85