LOOKS LIKE A STORM IS COMING

Primm Travel Blog

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STORM IS COMING

 

My favorite type of clouds:

 

Cumulus humilis is what is commonly referred to as "fair weather cumulus". In hot countries and over mountainous terrain these clouds occur at up to 6000 meters altitude, though elsewhere they are typically found lower.

 

They are formed by rising warm air that has been heated by the ground, which in turn has been heated by the sun. They have a limited depth (technically known as showing no significant vertical development). This indicates that the temperature in the atmosphere above them either drops off very slowly or not at all with altitude (see Lapse rate). While cumulus humilis may be accompanied by other cloud types, when they appear in a clear sky (see picture), they are an indicator of pleasant weather for the next several hours.

VIEW OF STATELINE
Though at times, these clouds collapse into stratocumulus clouds, and cover much of the sky.

 

Below the cloud base the air can be quite turbulent, giving occupants of light aircraft a rough ride. To avoid turbulence where such clouds are present, pilots may climb above the cloud tops. However glider pilots actively seek out the rising air to gain altitude.

 

Cumulus mediocris is a cloud form of the cumulus family, slightly larger in vertical development than Cumulus humilis. It may or may not show the cauliflower form characteristic of cumulus clouds. This cloud type does not produce precipitation, but may further advance into clouds such as Cumulus congestus and Cumulonimbus, which do.

 

Other clouds

 

A few clouds can be found above the troposphere; these include noctilucent and polar stratospheric clouds (or nacreous clouds), which occur in the mesosphere and stratosphere respectively.

MY FAVE

 

Some clouds form as a consequence of interactions with specific geographical features. Perhaps the strangest geographically-specific cloud in the world is Morning Glory, a rolling cylindrical cloud which appears unpredictably over the Gulf of Carpentaria in Northern Australia. Associated with a powerful "ripple" in the atmosphere, the cloud may be "surfed" in unpowered glider aircraft.

 

Cloud fields

 

A cloud field is simply a group of clouds but sometimes cloud fields can take on certain shapes that have their own characteristics and are specially classified. Stratocumulus clouds can often be found in the following forms:

 

    * Actinoform, which resembles a leaf or a spoked wheel.

THE PUFFY THE BETTER

    * Closed cell, which is cloudy in the center and clear on the edges, similar to a filled honeycomb.

    * Open cell, which resembles a honeycomb, with clouds around the edges and clear, open space in the middle.

 

Colors

 

The color of a cloud tells much about what is going on inside the cloud. Clouds form when relatively warm air containing water vapor is lighter than its surrounding air and this causes it to rise. As it rises it cools and the vapor condenses out of the air as micro-droplets. These tiny particles of water are relatively densely packed and sunlight cannot penetrate far into the cloud before it is reflected out, giving a cloud its characteristic white color.

SO FLUFFY
As a cloud matures, the droplets may combine to produce larger droplets, which may combine to form droplets large enough to fall as rain. In this process of accumulation, the space between droplets becomes larger and larger, permitting light to penetrate much farther into the cloud. If the cloud is sufficiently large and the droplets within are spaced far enough apart, it may be that a percentage of the light which enters the cloud is not reflected back out before it is absorbed (Think of how much farther one can see in a heavy rain as opposed to how far one can see in a heavy fog). This process of reflection/absorption is what leads to the range of cloud color from white through grey through black. For the same reason, the undersides of large clouds and heavy overcasts appear various degrees of grey; little light is being reflected or transmitted back to the observer.

 

Other colours occur naturally in clouds.

OTHER FAVE
Bluish-grey is the result of light scattering within the cloud. In the visible spectrum, blue and green are at the short end of light's visible wavelengths, while red and yellow are at the long end. The short rays are more easily scattered by water droplets, and the long rays are more likely to be absorbed. The bluish color is evidence that such scattering is being produced by rain-sized droplets in the cloud.

 

A greenish tinge to a cloud is produced when sunlight is scattered by ice. A cumulonimbus cloud which shows green is an imminent sign of heavy rain, hail, strong winds and possible tornadoes.

 

Yellowish clouds are rare but may occur in the late spring through early fall months during forest fire season. The yellow color is due to the presence of smoke.

 

Red, orange and pink clouds occur almost entirely at sunrise/sunset and are the result of the scattering of sunlight by the atmosphere.

WHILE AM DRIVING
The clouds are not that color; they are reflecting the long (and unscattered) rays of sunlight which are predominant at those hours. The effect is much the same as if one were to shine a red spotlight on a white sheet. In combination with large, mature thunderheads this can produce blood-red clouds.

    It has been suggested that Cloud feedback be merged into this article or section. (Discuss)

 

Global dimming

 

The recently recognized phenomenon of global dimming is thought to be caused by changes to the reflectivity of clouds due to the increased presence of aerosols and other particulates in the atmosphere.

 

Global brightening

 

New research From Dimming to Brightening: Decadal Changes in Solar Radiation at Earth's Surface by Martin Wild et al.

SCATTERED
(Science 6 May 2005; 308: 847-850) indicates global brightening trend.

 

Global brightening is caused by decreased amounts of particulate matter in the atmosphere. With less particulate matter there is less surface area for condensation to occur. Since there's less condensation in the atmosphere and increased evaporation caused by increasing amounts of sunlight striking the water's surface there is more moisture, causing fewer but thicker clouds.

 

 

Clouds on other planets

 

 

Within our solar system, any planet or moon with an atmosphere also has clouds. Venus' clouds are composed entirely of sulfuric acid droplets. Mars has high, thin clouds of water ice. Both Jupiter and Saturn have an outer cloud deck composed of ammonia clouds, an intermediate deck of ammonium hydrosulfide clouds and an inner deck of water clouds. Uranus and Neptune have atmospheres dominated by methane clouds.

 

Saturn's moon Titan has clouds which are believed to be composed largely of droplets of liquid methane. The Cassini-Huygens Saturn mission has uncovered evidence of a fluid cycle on Titan, including lakes near the poles and fluvial channels on the surface of the moon.

 

mellemel8 says:
hahaha he might correct me with the facts :P
Posted on: Aug 26, 2008
poohstanggt says:
Heinz would be so proud of you! LOL
Posted on: Aug 26, 2008
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STORM IS COMING
STORM IS COMING
VIEW OF STATELINE
VIEW OF STATELINE
MY FAVE
MY FAVE
THE PUFFY THE BETTER
THE PUFFY THE BETTER
SO FLUFFY
SO FLUFFY
OTHER FAVE
OTHER FAVE
WHILE AM DRIVING
WHILE AM DRIVING
SCATTERED
SCATTERED
Primm
photo by: jamartin39