Magnetic Island

Magnetic Island Travel Blog

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The ferry

The ridiculously-overpriced ferry (26 dollery-do's for 25 mins!) was actually a lot more fun than I had envisaged in the choppy Pacific waters. Once we had taken the zig-zag bus route to our hostel, Base, which sat on the eastern beach front at Nelly Bay, I knew that we weren't going to be doing too much while we were there. The hostel has the sea lapping at its feet and there's just a bit of a holiday vibe that meant for the first day there all I was going to do was run the batteries down on my iPod and do nothing more productive than semi-planning a route around Asia.

But this didn't go completely according to plan. We woke on our first morning to the sound of panic and warning of a tsunami tidal wave as people grabbed their stuff and headed for higher ground.

Where's this blasted tsunami then?
More disgruntled that I hadn't had chance to have any cereal than being scared, we walked up the road while rubbing the sleep out of our eyes. After a while of waiting with not a big wave or a Geordie in sight (apologies, people who got that), I disappointingly retreated back down the hill. Hearsay (not the pop group) said that there had been an earthquake in the Soloman Islands and that a tidal wave could hit the island that morning. We later heard, and I haven't checked this to be true, that Papua New Guinea acted as a buffer and meant that no adverse conditions were thus felt where we were. But that was about as exciting as the day got.

On our second day we were determined to at least get out and see some of the island. There are a number of bushwalks of varying lengths, so we picked a couple that we had heard good things about and set off on a hot and sunny day - a day that actually seemed perfect for doing nothing again.

Our resort's down there
Apparently, Magnetic Island has the biggest koala colony in Australia, with 2,500, compared to just 2,000 human inhabitants. Unfortunately, they were a lot more conspicuous than the population they outnumbered, hiding in trees, I would imagine. Despite keeping our eyes open, they managed to hide from us all day. That said, we did see bats, lizards and a wallabee on our travels.

The climax of our trek took us up to the Forts Walk, which passes lots of ex-military sites, gun emplacements and 'false' rocks used in the Second World War. At the top of the walk is the Observation Tower and Command Post which give spectacular views all around the coast. It was also where we bumped into a couple who we had spoken to a couple of times a few hundred miles down the coast - a very random spot to see them, in a gun observation deck. Oh, how we laughed.

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The ferry
The ferry
Wheres this blasted tsunami then?
Where's this blasted tsunami then?
Our resorts down there
Our resort's down there
Picnic Bay
Picnic Bay
Townsville from afar
Townsville from afar
Its dead
It's dead
Walking up...and up
Walking up...and up
Radical Bay
Radical Bay
Creepy crawlies
Creepy crawlies
Bats
Bats
Gun post
Gun post
Letterbox view from the Command Po…
Letterbox view from the Command P…
An eagle over the Command Post
An eagle over the Command Post
A view from the Observation Tower
A view from the Observation Tower
Magnetic Island
photo by: Morle