Hill of Crosses

Daugelaicial Travel Blog

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Hill of Crosses

My main goal of this daytrip was the Hill of the Crosses and after driving for 2½ hour after my visit to Trakai I finally entered the place. I must say that I was amazed and I was really happy to be there. This was something you dont see every day.

There are few places like this in every country and reading about the history surrounding the place made me understand the importance of being there if you were Lithuanian. For me the religious connection wouldn’t matter, this was a place symbolizing the freedom of the Lithuanian people.

I had never heard about this place until I saw the pictures that Ieva (Ewooce) posted on her blog from Marius Jovaisas’s photo album Neregėta Lietuva (Unseen Lithuania).

Hill of Crosses
When I looked trough all these wonderful pictures I remembered asking her about a picture from this place and at that moment I decided that I would go there.

Still today I am very happy that I made the trip out there; it was one of these strange and odd things that I never will forget.

The Hill of Crosses (Lithuanian: Kryžių kalnas) is a site of pilgrimage about 12 km north of the city of Šiauliai. The exact origins are unknown, but it is considered that the first crosses were placed on the former Jurgaičiai or Domantai hill fort after the 1831 Uprising. Over the centuries, not only crosses, but giant crucifixes, carvings of Lithuanian patriots, statues of the Virgin Mary and thousands of tiny effigies and rosaries have been brought here by Catholic pilgrims. The number of crosses is unknown, but estimates put it at about far beyond 50.

Hill of Crosses
000.

Over the centuries, the place has come to signify the peaceful endurance of Lithuanian Catholicism despite the threats it faced throughout history. After the 3rd partition of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1795, Lithuania became part of the Russian Empire. Poles and Lithuanians unsuccessfully rebelled against Russian authorities in 1831 and 1863. These two uprisings are connected with the beginnings of the hill: as families could not locate bodies of perished rebels, they started putting up symbolic crosses in place of a former hill fort.

When the old political structure of Eastern Europe fell apart in 1918, Lithuania once again declared its independence. Throughout this time, the Hill of Crosses was used as a place for Lithuanians to pray for peace, for their country, and for the loved ones they had lost during the Wars of Independence.

Hill of Crosses

Most recently, the site took on a special significance during the years 1944-1990, when Lithuania was occupied by the Soviet Union. Continuing to travel to the Hill and leave their tributes, Lithuanians used it to demonstrate their allegiance to their original identity, religion and heritage; it was a venue of peaceful resistance. Although the Soviets worked hard to remove new crosses, and bulldozed the site at least three times (including attempts in 1963 and 1973). There were even rumors that the authorities planned to build a dam on the nearby Kulvė River, a tributary to Mūša, so that the hill would end up under water.

On September 7, 1993, Pope John Paul II visited the Hill of Crosses, declaring it a place for hope, peace, love and sacrifice. In 2000 Franciscan Hermitage was opened nearby. The interior decoration draws links with La Verna, the mountain where St. Francis received his stigmata. The hill remains under nobody's jurisdiction; therefore people are free to build crosses as they see fit.

Chokk says:
It is an amazing place
Posted on: Apr 05, 2012
bigstoney82 says:
Wow, that does seem like an amazing place to visit, i'll have to try to get there in July! Thanks for letting me know about it.
Posted on: Apr 04, 2012
Africancrab says:
I should very much like to go there. Beautiful shots Christian.
Posted on: Dec 26, 2010
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Wedding at the Hill of Crosses
Wedding at the Hill of Crosses
Wedding at the Hill of Crosses
Wedding at the Hill of Crosses
Wedding at the Hill of Crosses
Wedding at the Hill of Crosses
Daugelaicial
photo by: Chokk