The End is Nigh

Monrovia Travel Blog

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The girls of cabin 3420

Thought I would actually write something this time, let people know what is going on here on the ship.  The end is getting closer, we are starting our final week of surgery.  By Friday, the OR will be finished and by next Friday the wards will be closed.  Its strange to think that this is the end.  I checked my calender and I only have 10 days left!  That is even scarier, where has the time gone?  Its hard to imagine it being near the Christmas season and snowing back home when its 90+ degrees here.  Part of me can't wait for snow, another part of me, the practical part, says no snow! 

Anyhoo, lets see.  Said goodbye to two of my roomies this weekend.  One, Sassika, a dutch ward nurse, left Friday and Amy, an Aussie ward nurse left Saturday.

Communial cheesecake for Jenna's going away party
  More and more friends are leaving, it truly means the end is nigh.   One of my friends from home emailed me the other day and said that I post a lot of pictures that have something to do with food, but thats what we do on the ship, we celebrate friendship with food, whether it be someone leaving, or someone's birthday or just cause we can. 

Saturday my orphanage came to visit us on the ship.  They arrived at the gate around 1, we went out to meet them and were shocked and suprised to see a small van (a cross between a mini van and a conversion) pull up.  Looking in we saw that all 33 kids and 7 adults were piled inside!  It was like a clown car, they just kept coming!  We started the time togehter with cookies and drinks.

Time to pepe!
  Before we started the tour, we took groups to go pepe (go to the bathroom).  It was hilarious!  First of all, they had to climb up the stairs to the bathroom, which most have never done before, they were scared.  Once they got to the bathroom, they were amazed, they loved using the toliets and washing their hands and we spent a good part of their visit using the bathroom!

I gave tours of the ship while the others played with the kids in one of the lecture rooms.  We watched Veggietales and had popcorn.  The kids had a suprise for us at the end.  Normally, when we go to visit them, they put on a little program of singing and Bible verses, etc.  So we weren't too suprised when the choir got up to sing.

Our little dancer
  What did suprise us was that 5 of the girls got dressed up in traditional dress and danced for us.  The solo dancer is the sweetest 6 year old and she's really good.  It was amazing!  Loved it!

Today was a busy day in the OR.  Even though we aren't doing big long cases, we are trying to get as much done as we can.  We did 5 cases today, everything from a dressing change to a couple cleft lips.  One of our frequent fliers to the OR is a little 7 year old boy name Kwelywoh Kollie.  He was born with what is called an encephelocele, which is when the skull doesn't close completely and the brain seeps out.  Anyway, Kollie is having complications, the hole that we fixed is not healing and CSF (the fluid that is around your brain) is seeping out.

Kollie- a before shot
  We are trying to drain it, but he is having to come back to the OR almost every other day to have his dressings changed.  The poor boy is fed up, rightly so, of it all.  Unfortunately, theres not a whole lot we can do, it just needs time, which is something we don't have.  He is scheduled to transfer to another hospital here shortly.  He is such a sweet boy, and his dad is so loving, they are often seen skipping down the hall together.  The only thing that seems to be wrong is the fact the hole is not closing.  Please send some prayer to our little Kollie.

Ended the day with a pizza party to honor our hard working translators.  These are local people Mercy Ships hires to help translate for our patients.

The end crew with our Translators, Roselyn, Anthony & Hawa
  Even though English (Liberian English is much different than any other type of English) is the offical language of Liberia, it is by far the only language here.  Each of the 14 tribes have their own dialect.  Here's an example.  I will ask the patient to "please take off your shoes", they usually look at me with no idea what I said, my translator will say "tak ouff youra slippa na" and they can't seem to get them off fast enough!  I've gotten pretty good at picking out what they are saying, but they don't ever seem to understand me, even when I try to speak with a Liberian accent and add an "O" to the end of my words (ie: sorry-o or fine-o or bad-o).  Anyhoo, back to the translators, couldn't survive without them.  So we had a dinner for them and gave them certificates of appreciation and gifts.  When the ship leaves in a couple of weeks, they will be without a job.  Its sad to think what they will do for money, but each one has plans to either continue with university or go to school.  I will miss my friends when we go our seperate ways.

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The girls of cabin 3420
The girls of cabin 3420
Communial cheesecake for Jennas g…
Communial cheesecake for Jenna's …
Time to pepe!
Time to pepe!
Our little dancer
Our little dancer
Kollie- a before shot
Kollie- a before shot
The end crew with our Translators,…
The end crew with our Translators…
The Liberian dancers
The Liberian dancers
The kids look to see high up they …
The kids look to see high up they…
A little bundle of sunshine- Edell
A little bundle of sunshine- Edell
Mark- one of the esphageal dilatio…
Mark- one of the esphageal dilati…
Josephs after picture (see Sept 2…
Joseph's after picture (see Sept …
Celebrating friendship with chocol…
Celebrating friendship with choco…
The box I mailed Aug 14 arrived to…
The box I mailed Aug 14 arrived t…
Monrovia
photo by: Bluenose