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Kowloon Travel Blog

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The famous street advertising (actually one fell on someone yesterday, it was on the news)
It rains in Hong Kong. A lot.

We are staying in Kowloon just across from Hong Kong island, where alot of the commercial centre is located. In fact I have never seen so many shopping centres in all my life. On our first day we went to find a guide book and ended up in Harbour City shopping centre, it took about 20 mins just to walk from one side to the other, and was a complete maze of very expensive designer shops. Thankfully there are also many markets so we can have a look at things which we might even be able to afford! Our hostel is in Sincere House, opposite the Ladies' market which sells clothes, toys and household items, sexist, nah! To be honest, it sold very similar things to the Temple Street night market which is sometimes called the Men's market, although there were a few more funky gadgets there, and lots of security cameras for sale strangely.
Mmmmm yummy!
We tried a bit of bargaining but there really wasn't anything we wanted all that much anyway.

On the way back from the night market we came across a restaurant selling 'fish lips' and were once again repulsed. We have so far come across beef reticulum, chicken spleen, and an article by a man who raved about eating a pig colon kebab. Seriously that's disgusting. We are finding it much harder than imagined to get vegetarian food (and I seriously considering becoming veggie for this part of the trip). They eat tofu, but in amongst the guts and stuff. The suggestion to ask the chef to serve it 'without' said guts has been met with varying degrees of confusion. This is strange as in England, Chinese restaurants are one of the easier places to find veggie food. Having said that, we haven't found any dish even remotely resembling a Western style Chinese meal.
Chinese lion dancing
Of course we should be enbracing the culture, but my gag reflex has limits. So we have decided that diving into the culture need not necessarily mean EVERY type of food, after all, we all eat Chinese, Indian etc etc in England, why should we feel bad for eating a pizza in China?

On Sunday we took advantage of the short break from the rain to go to Kowloon Park, where a local martial arts school did a demonstration of drumming, lion dancing and martial arts. It was a mixed bag, much like any school performance, some parts were fantastic, others not so much! The lion dancing in particular was fascinating. Their balance and agility were fantastic, expecially as it was turning into a very muggy day and everyone looked like they were feeling the heat! Strangely enough, the person who looked like they knew what they were doing most with their kung fu was a small girl who did a solo section, even better than the adult, although she did have the 'cute' factor in her favour!

Despite the threat of rain we decided to walk up to the harbour and onto the 'avenue of stars', similar to Hollywood's 'Hall of Fame' where Lisa enjoyed having her picture taken with the Bruce Lee statue and I had no idea who anyone was, (again, similar to Hollywood!).
The symphony of lights
It is such a shame that the weather has been so terrible, but even so the view across the harbour is stunning. The skyscrapers are so imposing especially against the dark green background of the mountains. Much of the time the mountains are obscured by cloud but we are hoping for a clear day. 

In the evening we had secured a spot on the harbourside to watch the 'Symphony of Lights' an 8 minute show where neon lights and rooftop lasers on the buildings are synchronised to music. Even though it didn't start til 8pm, we sat watching the lights come on for a couple of hours beforehand. Each time we looked around another building was lit up, it was like Vegas!!

Today we got the underground to the Island of Lantau where the airport is to see the Tian Tan Buddha, largest outdoor seated bronze Buddha statue.
Getting the cable car
Instead of the 1hr bus from the underground station we decided to get the new Ngong Ping 360 cable car up to the village. Wow what a journey! It took about 30 mins to get up there in about 8 sections, across water, past waterfalls, over forest and through valleys, WELL worth the extra money. The price of 88HK is usually increased to 1800HK to hire out a private car, however it wasn't very busy so they put each group in a seperate car anyway!! The views were incredible, and as the Buddha came into view it was very impressive. After a short walk through a rather touristy village we came to the bottom of 440 steps to get to the top. OH MY GOD. Even with numerous 'photo stops' we were practically crawling by the time we got up there! We allowed oursleves lots of time up there to catch our breath, as the views were stunning.
Yes, we really DID walk up all those stairs!


On the way back down it was still fairly quiet so we got a private cabin again. Lisa took this opportunity to get down on one knee and ask me to marry her!! Of course I said 'yes' immediatly, so we are now engaged!!!!! It is shame we can't boast to random people as we may have done in England, because they'll take us to prison or chop off our hands or something, but the next backpackers we see are going to get the whole story!!
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The famous street advertising (act…
The famous street advertising (ac…
Mmmmm yummy!
Mmmmm yummy!
Chinese lion dancing
Chinese lion dancing
The symphony of lights
The symphony of lights
Getting the cable car
Getting the cable car
Yes, we really DID walk up all tho…
Yes, we really DID walk up all th…
Wishing for better weather to real…
Wishing for better weather to rea…
Cant see the other side, I think …
Can't see the other side, I think…
I look a bit like an alien actually
I look a bit like an alien actually
Kowloon
photo by: Chokk