magical land.....

Kakadu National Park Travel Blog

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This really is a magical land. Today we visited the Ubirr Aboriginal lands at the top of the park on the edge of the Arnhemlands. This was a baking hot area of rocks... the drive in lead us through steep mountainous rocks on oneside, while the other side of the road, was a green wetland full of birds and wildlife. I cannot describe this place in words..... its breath taking ..... as we came along the road from Jabiru we startle a wild brumbie mare and her young foal grazing on the green grasses at the roadside, she runs alongside the road for a few paces before darting off into the bush in a trail of dust. The Ubirr site is very sacred to the locals, we are careful where we go, not leaving marked paths, the site is full of beautiful cave paintings and rock art.

The air if full of the sound of Whistler kites - Karina scares a rock wallaby as we climb, we say nothing but climb the rocks to the top of Ubirr. And the view...... ohhhhhh .... what a view! We can see across the wetlands into the mountains of the Arnhemland as they rise from the flat lands before them. The heat is oppressive - 45c and 80pc humidty and the heat reflects from the rocks like an oven - we can see the heat rippling across the open lands. Heavy clouds marks the horizon - the lightning man is coming - the wet will start soon - but for now its hot, humid and the air heavy. Coming down from the top I hear voices close by.... but no one is here.... just Karina and I - I notice she hears nothing  and was continuing taking her pictures... did I hear the spirits?.... I am not a religious man.... but this place has such a magical feel...... I know why the Aboriginal people mark this as a sacred spot - spirits or not...... its has a "feel" to it - its everywhere around us ...... its like the land talking ...... and soon its time to leave this place ... for not for ever..... we will be back........ I feel drawn to the Northern Territory like no place I have never been before, how can such an unspoiled place exist. We will be back soon..... I know it ......

Until then ..... Bo Bo 

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The name 'Kakadu' comes from an Aboriginal language called Kakadu or Gaagudju, which was one of the languages spoken in the north of the park at the beginning of the twentieth century. Gagudju is no longer regularly spoken but descendants of this language group still live in Kakadu.

The park has two seasons, 'wet' and 'dry'. In the wet (October to April) many of the attractions are impossible to get to, so the dry season (May to September) is the peak period for visitors. The local Bininj/Mungguy Aboriginal people recognize six seasons in the Kakadu region:

  • Gunumeleng - mid-October to late December, pre-monsoon storm season with hot weather and building thunderstorms building in the afternoons
  • Gudjewg - from January to March, monsoon season with thunderstorms, heavy rain, and flooding; the heat and humidity generate an explosion of plant and animal life
  • Banggerreng - April, the "knock 'em down storm" season where floodwater recedes but violent, windy storms knock down grasses
  • Yegge - from May to mid-June, relatively cool with low humidity, the Aboriginal people historically started burning the woodlands in patches to 'clean the country' and encourage new growth for grazing animals
  • Wurrgeng - from mid-June to mid-August, the cold weather season with low humidity; most creeks stop flowing and the floodplains quickly dry out
  • Gurrung - from mid-August to mid-October, hot dry weather with ever shrinking billabongs

 

The attractions include the opportunity to learn about the people, geology, plants and animals which make Kakadu a unique and precious resource, not only for Australians but for all the people in the world.

The Bowali Visitor Centre contains a wealth of information about Kakadu. The Warradjan Aboriginal Cultural Centre presents the culture of the local Aboriginal people in an accessible way.

However, the wetlands provide the greatest visual pleasure. The freshwater and estuarine (saltwater) crocodiles sleep on the banks of the Alligator Rivers or the many billabongs for most of the day but can also be seen floating or swimming in the water. Birdlife abounds from the stately Jabiru to the amusing "Jesus" bird (Jacana) as it steps from lily pad to lily pad. At dusk on the Yellow Water billabong (Ngurrungurrudjba), hundred of herons circle overhead landing and taking off from half-submerged trees. Ospreys sit on termite mounds or soar on high looking for prey beneath the still waters. The billabongs of the Kakadu national park are anything but "stagnant pools of water"

The Kakadu is just a super experience and one I will never forgot - its a lovely magical place.

why do they call it the Kakadu? We…
why do they call it the Kakadu? W…
On the road to ubirr
On the road to ubirr
On the road to ubirr
On the road to ubirr
Ubirr is a sacred Aborignal site t…
Ubirr is a sacred Aborignal site …
Some of the drawings are very vivid
Some of the drawings are very vivid
Ubirr Art
Ubirr Art
Ubirr Art
Ubirr Art
some of the art work was in amazin…
some of the art work was in amazi…
fantastic view from the top of the…
fantastic view from the top of th…
fantastic view from the top of the…
fantastic view from the top of th…
fantastic view from the top of the…
fantastic view from the top of th…
fantastic view from the top of the…
fantastic view from the top of th…
fantastic view from the top of the…
fantastic view from the top of th…
fantastic view from the top of the…
fantastic view from the top of th…
Ubirr is a magical place - you can…
Ubirr is a magical place - you ca…
Nourlangie rock art - the lightnin…
Nourlangie rock art - the lightni…
lovely rocks at Nourlangie
lovely rocks at Nourlangie
lovely rocks at Nourlangie
lovely rocks at Nourlangie
Nourlangie rock art
Nourlangie rock art
beautiful bushlands at Nourlangie
beautiful bushlands at Nourlangie
Kakadu National Park
photo by: Biedjee